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Kismet
08-11-2018, 07:29 PM,
#1
Kismet
Kismet, another word for fate or fortune.

We have to ask ourselves WHY did F mention that a kid gave him that book? When did this kid that F didn’t like at all give him the book? Was it in grade school? Probably unlikely, since Kismet (the play) was published in 1911.

And WHY is this book mentioned in important literature? And with an aberration attached to it as a beacon to “come and see?” The aberration is that there are no “pickpockets” in the book or play.

Well, I read the whole play. It is pretty interesting, actually.

The plot, in a nutshell, is this:

1. There’s a beggar, Hajj, who is an imposter of the real Hajj, who put a curse on another beggar named Jawan many years ago. In a strange twist of FATE (a HUGE theme in this play), Jawan had killed the imposter Hajj’s wife and son many years before. His daughter, Marsinah, is spared, and she is also a con artist.

2. So as Hajj is begging, a man with a scarf wrapped around his face comes near. Word has spread that a sheikh has come to find Hajj and implore him to lift the curse on his son.

3. Jawan approaches Hajj and Hajj (seeing an opportunity to con money out of the grief-stricken father) boasts of his ability to lift curses. Of course, he doesn’t know anything about the real Hajj, whose identity he had stolen. Once the curse is lifted, Jawan tears off the scarf in the most dramatic fashion ever and squeals happily that Hajj has blessed his enemy.

4. Hajj is like “Confound it and confound fate for doing this terrible deed!”
But Jawan throws him a fat purse of money and Hajj is gonna take advantage of that, you betcha.

5. Meanwhile, his daughter is having a secret rendezvous with the young ruler, the Caliph. They are madly in love. What the play doesn’t tell you directly, but hints at, is that the caliph’s advisor is OMAR KHAYYAM (yes, THAT OK who “wrote” the Rubaiyat and the poem that talks about it being “neither here nor there” in ttotc).

6. After many more fateful twists, Hajj is thrown into the dungeon with Jawan. A guard eventually comes in and pardons Jawan but tells Hajj he’s gonna get some butt whooping and his hand cut off.

7. Hajj is desperate as Jawan acts like a hysterical hyena and brags that he has a knife with “Luck” carved on the blade. Hajj leaps on Jawan and kills him, and once again, steals an identity—this time Jawan’s. He dresses in Jawan’s clothes and puts his clothes on the dead Jawan.

8. So now Hajj has stolen two identities. A fraud if ever there was one. But NOT a pickpocket.

9. At the very end of the play, Hajj says the words repeated in ttotc: “To the Caliph I am dirt, but to the dirt, I am Caliph.”

F says Hajj had to be an educated guy to say something that good. That’s on page 14 in ttotc.

Tie a string on that to page 101, where F quotes a few quatrains from Omar Khayyam. And then Google Omar Khayyam.

And then find Kismet on a map. It’s close to “in peace.” Many of you know the Kismet I’m talking about.

But, in that place, I can certainly see F being “enlightened.”






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08-11-2018, 09:56 PM, (This post was last modified: 08-11-2018, 09:57 PM by Becky from WV.)
#2
RE: Kismet
@Mindy - Here's the synopsis I found.

**********
Kismet is set in one day (& one morning). We follow a poet in ancient Baghdad, who tries to earn his & his grown-up daughter's living by selling poems to people walking by ... NOT a very profitable business.
So when the opportunity arises he assumes the identity of Hadjj the beggar (more profitable by far).

It turns out that beggar once cursed the evil Jawan who then lost his son & now, as he feels death approaching, searches for Hadjj the beggar to remove the curse & retrieve the missing son. The Poet has no idea about all that, but seeing Jawan will have him killed if he doesn't cooperate, he claims to have those magical powers & promises him (for $$$) that Jawan will find his son this very day. The Poet is allowed to live & is rewarded with a small fortune. Most of this he gives to his daughter (Marsinah), so she can buy all that her heart desires. While she does so on her own, the Caliph sees her & falls in love with her on first sight. He is dressed like an ordinary man, despite being the most powerful man in the country, the head of state. He follows Marsinah into the garden of a house she wants to buy & she falls in love with him, too.

While the life of his daughter takes this massive turn, our Poet enjoys a bit of TLC by his newly bought slaves (three ladies) when he is mistakenly arrested for a crime he didn't commit & brought in front of the court of the Wazir of Baghdad (the political advisor of the Caliph, so he is the 2nd most powerful man in the state. He orders the Poet's hand to be cut off for being a thief. But luckily the cunning wife of the Wazir likes his looks & sets her mind on getting him out of there in one piece, with his right hand intact.

The court case is interrupted by the head of police with the news that the infamous murderer/thief Jawan has finally been caught. They bring him in & he identifies the Poet as the man who claimed to be a wizard who had promised him that he'd find his long lost son on this very day. Then Jawan notices the Wazir is wearing an amulet he had given him when he was still a child. At last he has found his son!

The Wazir now believes in the Poet's magical abilities & decides a man like this will be very useful when he is on his side. He commands his wife to keep him entertained. She doesn't need to be told twice, as she is quite keen on having the handsome Poet to herself. She knows perfectly well he is no wizard, but if it serves the purpose of keeping him in the palace, so be it.

The Wazir is in desperate need of $$$, so he wants the Caliph to marry the three princesses of a neighbouring country to seal a deal with their father. He urges the The Poet/Beggar/Wizard to prevent this marriage & as a reward he will make him an Emir (a high ranking noble man). The Poet accepts & hopes that the young lovers will fall out eventually. He has absolutely no idea that the future happiness of his daughter is at stake. The Wazir threatens to execute him should the Caliph indeed marry this mystery girl he met on the street.

Things get more & more complicated, but in the last scene the Poet manages to unite Marisnah & the Caliph (by actually killing the Wazir, who faked a marriage to Marsinah so the Caliph could not have her.) He had planned to poison her the next night so that she could not reveal the truth. He is then allowed to spend the rest of his days with the Wazir's widow Lalume. All's well that ends well.

**********

The whole thing sounds awful to me, & it has absolutely NO bearing on my solve. I doubt if a grade-school child could have had that play ... much less read it. All I can come up with is that only the title is important to FF because of it's meaning. Kismet ... destiny/fate - an event (or a course of events) that will inevitably happen in the future.

But perhaps FF is leading us to the 1959 movie "Pickpocket". Michel is a petty thief who, after being arrested & then released, starts discussing the rights & wrongs of crime with the police inspector. The only way he can find a place for himself in society is to engineer a head-on collision with it. It gives him a reason to live. In that way, picking pockets becomes an exciting, almost sexual adventure. It is a kind of pact with the Devil. But he has to leave France for London when the band of thieves he joins is arrested. When he returns he is also caught.

It is only when he is visited in prison by Jeanne, the girl who looked after his mother before she died & is now abandoned with a child, that he realises that his whole life could be changed by love. The humiliation of prison inspires him to a desperate act of faith.

I do NOT know what the "act" is because that's all I found. But I think it probably has nothing to do with the Chase.
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08-12-2018, 01:52 AM,
#3
RE: Kismet
Where does he refer to this? Which book?
Reply
08-12-2018, 02:05 AM,
#4
RE: Kismet
(08-11-2018, 07:29 PM)Mindy Wrote: Kismet, another word for fate or fortune.

We have to ask ourselves WHY did F mention that a kid gave him that book? When did this kid that F didn’t like at all give him the book? Was it in grade school? Probably unlikely, since Kismet (the play) was published in 1911.

And WHY is this book mentioned in important literature? And with an aberration attached to it as a beacon to “come and see?” The aberration is that there are no “pickpockets” in the book or play.

Well, I read the whole play. It is pretty interesting, actually.

The plot, in a nutshell, is this:

1. There’s a beggar, Hajj, who is an imposter of the real Hajj, who put a curse on another beggar named Jawan many years ago. In a strange twist of FATE (a HUGE theme in this play), Jawan had killed the imposter Hajj’s wife and son many years before. His daughter, Marsinah, is spared, and she is also a con artist.

2. So as Hajj is begging, a man with a scarf wrapped around his face comes near. Word has spread that a sheikh has come to find Hajj and implore him to lift the curse on his son.

3. Jawan approaches Hajj and Hajj (seeing an opportunity to con money out of the grief-stricken father) boasts of his ability to lift curses. Of course, he doesn’t know anything about the real Hajj, whose identity he had stolen. Once the curse is lifted, Jawan tears off the scarf in the most dramatic fashion ever and squeals happily that Hajj has blessed his enemy.

4. Hajj is like “Confound it and confound fate for doing this terrible deed!”
But Jawan throws him a fat purse of money and Hajj is gonna take advantage of that, you betcha.

5. Meanwhile, his daughter is having a secret rendezvous with the young ruler, the Caliph. They are madly in love. What the play doesn’t tell you directly, but hints at, is that the caliph’s advisor is OMAR KHAYYAM (yes, THAT OK who “wrote” the Rubaiyat and the poem that talks about it being “neither here nor there” in ttotc).

6. After many more fateful twists, Hajj is thrown into the dungeon with Jawan. A guard eventually comes in and pardons Jawan but tells Hajj he’s gonna get some butt whooping and his hand cut off.

7. Hajj is desperate as Jawan acts like a hysterical hyena and brags that he has a knife with “Luck” carved on the blade. Hajj leaps on Jawan and kills him, and once again, steals an identity—this time Jawan’s. He dresses in Jawan’s clothes and puts his clothes on the dead Jawan.

8. So now Hajj has stolen two identities. A fraud if ever there was one. But NOT a pickpocket.

9. At the very end of the play, Hajj says the words repeated in ttotc: “To the Caliph I am dirt, but to the dirt, I am Caliph.”

F says Hajj had to be an educated guy to say something that good. That’s on page 14 in ttotc.

Tie a string on that to page 101, where F quotes a few quatrains from Omar Khayyam. And then Google Omar Khayyam.

And then find Kismet on a map. It’s close to “in peace.” Many of you know the Kismet I’m talking about.

But, in that place, I can certainly see F being “enlightened.”






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Sounds a lot like an alladin story to me ! The street rat!
Reply
08-12-2018, 08:09 AM, (This post was last modified: 08-12-2018, 08:09 AM by Mindy.)
#5
Kismet
(08-12-2018, 02:05 AM)McFly Wrote:
(08-11-2018, 07:29 PM)Mindy Wrote: Kismet, another word for fate or fortune.

We have to ask ourselves WHY did F mention that a kid gave him that book? When did this kid that F didn’t like at all give him the book? Was it in grade school? Probably unlikely, since Kismet (the play) was published in 1911.

And WHY is this book mentioned in important literature? And with an aberration attached to it as a beacon to “come and see?” The aberration is that there are no “pickpockets” in the book or play.

Well, I read the whole play. It is pretty interesting, actually.

The plot, in a nutshell, is this:

1. There’s a beggar, Hajj, who is an imposter of the real Hajj, who put a curse on another beggar named Jawan many years ago. In a strange twist of FATE (a HUGE theme in this play), Jawan had killed the imposter Hajj’s wife and son many years before. His daughter, Marsinah, is spared, and she is also a con artist.

2. So as Hajj is begging, a man with a scarf wrapped around his face comes near. Word has spread that a sheikh has come to find Hajj and implore him to lift the curse on his son.

3. Jawan approaches Hajj and Hajj (seeing an opportunity to con money out of the grief-stricken father) boasts of his ability to lift curses. Of course, he doesn’t know anything about the real Hajj, whose identity he had stolen. Once the curse is lifted, Jawan tears off the scarf in the most dramatic fashion ever and squeals happily that Hajj has blessed his enemy.

4. Hajj is like “Confound it and confound fate for doing this terrible deed!”
But Jawan throws him a fat purse of money and Hajj is gonna take advantage of that, you betcha.

5. Meanwhile, his daughter is having a secret rendezvous with the young ruler, the Caliph. They are madly in love. What the play doesn’t tell you directly, but hints at, is that the caliph’s advisor is OMAR KHAYYAM (yes, THAT OK who “wrote” the Rubaiyat and the poem that talks about it being “neither here nor there” in ttotc).

6. After many more fateful twists, Hajj is thrown into the dungeon with Jawan. A guard eventually comes in and pardons Jawan but tells Hajj he’s gonna get some butt whooping and his hand cut off.

7. Hajj is desperate as Jawan acts like a hysterical hyena and brags that he has a knife with “Luck” carved on the blade. Hajj leaps on Jawan and kills him, and once again, steals an identity—this time Jawan’s. He dresses in Jawan’s clothes and puts his clothes on the dead Jawan.

8. So now Hajj has stolen two identities. A fraud if ever there was one. But NOT a pickpocket.

9. At the very end of the play, Hajj says the words repeated in ttotc: “To the Caliph I am dirt, but to the dirt, I am Caliph.”

F says Hajj had to be an educated guy to say something that good. That’s on page 14 in ttotc.

Tie a string on that to page 101, where F quotes a few quatrains from Omar Khayyam. And then Google Omar Khayyam.

And then find Kismet on a map. It’s close to “in peace.” Many of you know the Kismet I’m talking about.

But, in that place, I can certainly see F being “enlightened.”






Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Sounds a lot like an alladin story to me ! The street rat!


Kismet was actually set in the time of Arabian Nights, and it’s subtitle was “An Arabian Night in 3 Acts.” Maybe that’s also the hint, along with Kismet.


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(08-12-2018, 01:52 AM)mrmagicarovrumrebel Wrote: Where does he refer to this? Which book?


TTotC, in Important Literature. He says a kid he didn’t like at all gave him a copy of Kismet...


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Mindy's blogs:

http://www.fennhotspot.com
http://www.myeverwonderland.blogspot.com
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08-12-2018, 09:12 AM,
#6
RE: Kismet
https://www.summitpost.org/kismet/668443
Reply
08-12-2018, 10:56 AM,
#7
Kismet
(08-12-2018, 09:12 AM)nkown Wrote: https://www.summitpost.org/kismet/668443


I’m thinking of a different Kismet.


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Mindy's blogs:

http://www.fennhotspot.com
http://www.myeverwonderland.blogspot.com
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08-12-2018, 11:10 AM,
#8
RE: Kismet
WY_Features_20170401.txt:1600735|Kismet Peak|Summit|WY|56|Sublette|035|430558N|1101528W|43.0993829|-110.2576724|||||2565|8415|Kismet Peak|06/05/1979|

MT_Features_20170401.txt:785776|Kismet Creek|Stream|MT|30|Sanders|089|475250N|1154516W|47.8804857|-115.7543374|475438N|1154703W|47.9105556|-115.7841667|712|2336|Noxon|04/04/1980|
Reply
08-12-2018, 11:49 AM,
#9
Kismet
(08-12-2018, 11:10 AM)John Brown Wrote: WY_Features_20170401.txt:1600735|Kismet Peak|Summit|WY|56|Sublette|035|430558N|1101528W|43.0993829|-110.2576724|||||2565|8415|Kismet Peak|06/05/1979|

MT_Features_20170401.txt:785776|Kismet Creek|Stream|MT|30|Sanders|089|475250N|1154516W|47.8804857|-115.7543374|475438N|1154703W|47.9105556|-115.7841667|712|2336|Noxon|04/04/1980|


I favor your first one, JB. If you look on F’s map, it is “in peace.”

[Image: 31b341d7d1ba82d64df0274568d427d8.jpg]


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http://www.fennhotspot.com
http://www.myeverwonderland.blogspot.com
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08-12-2018, 06:05 PM, (This post was last modified: 08-13-2018, 09:54 AM by trigace.)
#10
RE: Kismet
The hints are only in his words, not in any book (except TTOTC) or story he refers to.

Example: Kismet = K is me T

This means that Fenn or his poem entity (seek, Know, and weaK) is actually in the image of a K. It is a thin K, so THINK. Also this K is the very bottom of the future T that is to be drawn. So, K is me T.
.
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"Sometimes treasures are not gold, sometimes riches are not gold, sometimes a trove is not gold, and sometimes even gold is not gold."
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