Not logged in. Login - Register


All new registrations need to be approved manually. After registration, mail me at tyblossom at aol dot com.
ChaseChat is available for Smartphones via Tapatalk, Download the app at http://tapatalk.com/m?id=4&referer=1048173. After installing CLICK HERE to add the forum to Tapatalk.

Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 1 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
"So hear me all and listen good" . . .
08-06-2017, 07:38 PM,
#1
"So hear me all and listen good" . . .
People have talked about "layers" in the poem. For my purposes, I'm
treating the poem as directions for a searcher. But -- for what it's worth -- the poem can be looked at for more "literary" purposes than simply a set of route directions to the TC. This "literary" (rather than route directions)
approach is what I'll be addressing, for what it's worth. It may provide a
small hint that could help with figuring out the physical route to the TC.

The part "So hear me all and listen good" has me thinking about the
narrator (FF) giving a speech to a large audience. Who comprises the audience?

It has been mentioned that "brave and in the wood" may refer to dead soldiers in (wooden) coffins. If the narrator is talking to them, I can imagine that they are near him . . . figuratively, anyway. If he was at a large military cemetery, looking at a bunch of headstones, giving a
speech, he may have been wanting to share his thoughts with the
soldiers, although they're all dead and can't hear him. He did lament the fact that they are forgotten, and may have never received the acknowledgment (for their bravery and sacrifice, perhaps?) that FF may think they deserve. So if he was at a cemetery, talking to the dead soldiers he would be "honoring" them . . . even if he may only be really addressing himself. People do this all the time. Funerals are for the living
. . . such as surviving family members and friends of the deceased,
regardless of whether one wants to admit it. No mystery there.

FF's words "Your effort will be worth the cold" may be "addressed" to the dead soldiers, meaning that "Your bravery and sacrifice in fighting for a (presumably) good and just cause is equal to the death you are now
experiencing." In other words, "The good you achieved in war is worth
the price you paid (your life)." Although one could certainly debate
this from a "values" and/or "ethics" standpoint, I can easily imagine a
surviving soldier having these (or similar) thoughts. Okay, back to the
scenario of FF "honoring" a multitude of dead soldiers. He then continues
with "I give you title to the gold." This could metaphorically mean that
he is leaving the TC and its contents in the "possession" of his (dead)
audience, to honor them. It is also symbolic of him "sacrificing" something
dear to himself, in their honor . . . even though he knows, pragmatically,
that it won't benefit them. There's an old tradition of pouring wine onto
the ground to honor dead family members. I think it's a waste of wine --
and would much rather see people raise a glass to "toast" the dead folks. But regardless, the old tradition is important to some people, because people are emotionally fragile and sometimes feel guilt, shame, or other similar things as a result of the death of a family member. Of course,
sometimes it's regret -- after the fact -- that the survivor(s) didn't spend
more time with the relative while the relative was still alive. If not guilt,
then at least regret.

Anyway, FF may be "giving" the goodies to dead soldiers (in general,
worldwide) with his statement "I give you title to the gold."

The above is my discussion about symbolism, acknowledgment of dead
soldiers, possible guilt and/or regret, etc.

Now back to how it all may relate to the "route directions" in a less-
emotional way: The physical location may tend to be symbolic of a large
group of dead soldiers. Although FF has said that the TC is not in a
cemetery, anyone in the correct "final search location" will immediately
recognize this place as "fitting" my discussion, above.

This is my opinion. Yours may differ. Please emphasize safety if/when
you are in the Rockies.
Reply
08-07-2017, 12:56 PM,
#2
RE: "So hear me all and listen good" . . .
(08-06-2017, 07:38 PM)Andrew Jef Wrote: People have talked about "layers" in the poem. For my purposes, I'm
treating the poem as directions for a searcher. But -- for what it's worth -- the poem can be looked at for more "literary" purposes than simply a set of route directions to the TC. This "literary" (rather than route directions)
approach is what I'll be addressing, for what it's worth. It may provide a
small hint that could help with figuring out the physical route to the TC.

The part "So hear me all and listen good" has me thinking about the
narrator (FF) giving a speech to a large audience. Who comprises the audience?

It has been mentioned that "brave and in the wood" may refer to dead soldiers in (wooden) coffins. If the narrator is talking to them, I can imagine that they are near him . . . figuratively, anyway. If he was at a large military cemetery, looking at a bunch of headstones, giving a
speech, he may have been wanting to share his thoughts with the
soldiers, although they're all dead and can't hear him. He did lament the fact that they are forgotten, and may have never received the acknowledgment (for their bravery and sacrifice, perhaps?) that FF may think they deserve. So if he was at a cemetery, talking to the dead soldiers he would be "honoring" them . . . even if he may only be really addressing himself. People do this all the time. Funerals are for the living
. . . such as surviving family members and friends of the deceased,
regardless of whether one wants to admit it. No mystery there.

FF's words "Your effort will be worth the cold" may be "addressed" to the dead soldiers, meaning that "Your bravery and sacrifice in fighting for a (presumably) good and just cause is equal to the death you are now
experiencing." In other words, "The good you achieved in war is worth
the price you paid (your life)." Although one could certainly debate
this from a "values" and/or "ethics" standpoint, I can easily imagine a
surviving soldier having these (or similar) thoughts. Okay, back to the
scenario of FF "honoring" a multitude of dead soldiers. He then continues
with "I give you title to the gold." This could metaphorically mean that
he is leaving the TC and its contents in the "possession" of his (dead)
audience, to honor them. It is also symbolic of him "sacrificing" something
dear to himself, in their honor . . . even though he knows, pragmatically,
that it won't benefit them. There's an old tradition of pouring wine onto
the ground to honor dead family members. I think it's a waste of wine --
and would much rather see people raise a glass to "toast" the dead folks. But regardless, the old tradition is important to some people, because people are emotionally fragile and sometimes feel guilt, shame, or other similar things as a result of the death of a family member. Of course,
sometimes it's regret -- after the fact -- that the survivor(s) didn't spend
more time with the relative while the relative was still alive. If not guilt,
then at least regret.

Anyway, FF may be "giving" the goodies to dead soldiers (in general,
worldwide) with his statement "I give you title to the gold."

The above is my discussion about symbolism, acknowledgment of dead
soldiers, possible guilt and/or regret, etc.

Now back to how it all may relate to the "route directions" in a less-
emotional way: The physical location may tend to be symbolic of a large
group of dead soldiers. Although FF has said that the TC is not in a
cemetery, anyone in the correct "final search location" will immediately
recognize this place as "fitting" my discussion, above.

This is my opinion. Yours may differ. Please emphasize safety if/when
you are in the Rockies.

AJ,
I believe you hit the nail right on the head. You may want to add that there are other people in the poem that Mr. Fenn is honoring or recognizing including family and friends.
Reply
08-07-2017, 01:10 PM,
#3
RE: "So hear me all and listen good" . . .
(08-06-2017, 07:38 PM)Andrew Jef Wrote: People have talked about "layers" in the poem. For my purposes, I'm
treating the poem as directions for a searcher. But -- for what it's worth -- the poem can be looked at for more "literary" purposes than simply a set of route directions to the TC. This "literary" (rather than route directions)
approach is what I'll be addressing, for what it's worth. It may provide a
small hint that could help with figuring out the physical route to the TC.

The part "So hear me all and listen good" has me thinking about the
narrator (FF) giving a speech to a large audience. Who comprises the audience?

It has been mentioned that "brave and in the wood" may refer to dead soldiers in (wooden) coffins. If the narrator is talking to them, I can imagine that they are near him . . . figuratively, anyway. If he was at a large military cemetery, looking at a bunch of headstones, giving a
speech, he may have been wanting to share his thoughts with the
soldiers, although they're all dead and can't hear him. He did lament the fact that they are forgotten, and may have never received the acknowledgment (for their bravery and sacrifice, perhaps?) that FF may think they deserve. So if he was at a cemetery, talking to the dead soldiers he would be "honoring" them . . . even if he may only be really addressing himself. People do this all the time. Funerals are for the living
. . . such as surviving family members and friends of the deceased,
regardless of whether one wants to admit it. No mystery there.

FF's words "Your effort will be worth the cold" may be "addressed" to the dead soldiers, meaning that "Your bravery and sacrifice in fighting for a (presumably) good and just cause is equal to the death you are now
experiencing." In other words, "The good you achieved in war is worth
the price you paid (your life)." Although one could certainly debate
this from a "values" and/or "ethics" standpoint, I can easily imagine a
surviving soldier having these (or similar) thoughts. Okay, back to the
scenario of FF "honoring" a multitude of dead soldiers. He then continues
with "I give you title to the gold." This could metaphorically mean that
he is leaving the TC and its contents in the "possession" of his (dead)
audience, to honor them. It is also symbolic of him "sacrificing" something
dear to himself, in their honor . . . even though he knows, pragmatically,
that it won't benefit them. There's an old tradition of pouring wine onto
the ground to honor dead family members. I think it's a waste of wine --
and would much rather see people raise a glass to "toast" the dead folks. But regardless, the old tradition is important to some people, because people are emotionally fragile and sometimes feel guilt, shame, or other similar things as a result of the death of a family member. Of course,
sometimes it's regret -- after the fact -- that the survivor(s) didn't spend
more time with the relative while the relative was still alive. If not guilt,
then at least regret.

Anyway, FF may be "giving" the goodies to dead soldiers (in general,
worldwide) with his statement "I give you title to the gold."

The above is my discussion about symbolism, acknowledgment of dead
soldiers, possible guilt and/or regret, etc.

Now back to how it all may relate to the "route directions" in a less-
emotional way: The physical location may tend to be symbolic of a large
group of dead soldiers. Although FF has said that the TC is not in a
cemetery, anyone in the correct "final search location" will immediately
recognize this place as "fitting" my discussion, above.

This is my opinion. Yours may differ. Please emphasize safety if/when
you are in the Rockies.

interesting imo completely wrong,not even close
*
Reply
08-07-2017, 02:03 PM,
#4
RE: "So hear me all and listen good" . . .
AJ: Despite you and I locking horns about cactus/deserts the other day, I think this is a well-thought out post and at the very least, you may be right about there being a soldier/"fallen comrade" aspect to the poem or hidey spot.
Reply
08-07-2017, 03:32 PM,
#5
RE: "So hear me all and listen good" . . .
(08-07-2017, 12:56 PM)Daniel A Wrote: AJ,
I believe you hit the nail right on the head. You may want to add that there are other people in the poem that Mr. Fenn is honoring or recognizing including family and friends.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Daniel A, I hadn't thought about those other folks (family and friends) in
the context, but can certainly see it that way . . . particularly, folks that
have been outdoors in that part of the Rockies (i.e., being "brave and in
the wood"). He may also be thinking about Skip, who, during a bravery-
requiring experience (scuba diving at 90 feet), "bought the farm".

Thanks for posting.
Reply
08-07-2017, 03:57 PM,
#6
RE: "So hear me all and listen good" . . .
(08-07-2017, 03:32 PM)Andrew Jef Wrote:
(08-07-2017, 12:56 PM)Daniel A Wrote: AJ,
I believe you hit the nail right on the head. You may want to add that there are other people in the poem that Mr. Fenn is honoring or recognizing including family and friends.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Daniel A, I hadn't thought about those other folks (family and friends) in
the context, but can certainly see it that way . . . particularly, folks that
have been outdoors in that part of the Rockies (i.e., being "brave and in
the wood"). He may also be thinking about Skip, who, during a bravery-
requiring experience (scuba diving at 90 feet), "bought the farm".

Thanks for posting.

it has nothing to do with fallen soldiers ,just trying to save your vacation money
*
Reply
08-07-2017, 04:57 PM,
#7
RE: "So hear me all and listen good" . . .
(08-07-2017, 03:57 PM)pidmt Wrote:
(08-07-2017, 03:32 PM)Andrew Jef Wrote:
(08-07-2017, 12:56 PM)Daniel A Wrote: AJ,
I believe you hit the nail right on the head. You may want to add that there are other people in the poem that Mr. Fenn is honoring or recognizing including family and friends.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Daniel A, I hadn't thought about those other folks (family and friends) in
the context, but can certainly see it that way . . . particularly, folks that
have been outdoors in that part of the Rockies (i.e., being "brave and in
the wood"). He may also be thinking about Skip, who, during a bravery-
requiring experience (scuba diving at 90 feet), "bought the farm".

Thanks for posting.

it has nothing to do with fallen soldiers ,just trying to save your vacation money

--------------------------------------------------------------------

pidmt, thank you for your effort(s) to change my mind. I suggest that
you save your thoughts and energies for something more useful, such
as improving any "general" solve that you may now have.

I have budgeted for this treasure hunt, and don't take vacations. And
my solve does not depend on fallen soldiers or symbolism. Thoughts of
those things do, however, tend to help confirm the validity of my solve.
Reply
08-07-2017, 05:04 PM,
#8
RE: "So hear me all and listen good" . . .
(08-07-2017, 03:57 PM)pidmt Wrote:
(08-07-2017, 03:32 PM)Andrew Jef Wrote:
(08-07-2017, 12:56 PM)Daniel A Wrote: AJ,
I believe you hit the nail right on the head. You may want to add that there are other people in the poem that Mr. Fenn is honoring or recognizing including family and friends.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Daniel A, I hadn't thought about those other folks (family and friends) in
the context, but can certainly see it that way . . . particularly, folks that
have been outdoors in that part of the Rockies (i.e., being "brave and in
the wood"). He may also be thinking about Skip, who, during a bravery-
requiring experience (scuba diving at 90 feet), "bought the farm".

Thanks for posting.

it has nothing to do with fallen soldiers ,just trying to save your vacation money
Thanks for the concern pidmt..."listen children to a story that was written long ago"...."listen good" Mr. Fenn may be voicing his feelings about war. If you put a space after the letter "m" in the word warm you have the word war....m.
Reply
08-07-2017, 05:12 PM, (This post was last modified: 08-07-2017, 05:14 PM by easternOHsteve.)
#9
RE: "So hear me all and listen good" . . .
It is a deep thought about war. I wish war was a very last resort; alas, man is vindictive and greedy.
But think a bit harder on his statement about his chapter about his service to the country in Vietnam. Don't make it so very deep! You may get a surprise. BOTG will be your best bet.
I am coming back down soon; didn't finish my jaunt because of rain last month. Close don't count in the hunt.
Reply
08-08-2017, 02:58 AM,
#10
RE: "So hear me all and listen good" . . .
Good thinking, it would explain cold and bravery, and it ties in to an incomplete solution I shelved because of a dead end and not enough clues. No doubt this leads me an area other than yours initially, but I have an idea of where you are thinking, Andrew... a few in fact. This would fit those too, but not as well, so far.

I have a few jigsaw puzzles going in this chase. I take pieces and put them where they fit. It's not erratic thought, it's organized thinking with broad scope. You're not likely to catch a rare fish in a vast ocean by sitting on one dock, in one hemisphere, with one kind of bait, looking at the fish saying, "It has fins, gills, and a tail... maybe I'm on the right track!", but trawling the coastlines with a dragnet might just catch it and then you look for tell tale signs.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Hear Me All and Listen Good Jbrewski 13 2,317 06-26-2017, 05:50 PM
Last Post: old drum
  so here me all and listen good FlashFlood 27 4,148 05-06-2017, 06:14 PM
Last Post: FlashFlood
  Hear me all / listen good James Perotti 9 1,644 11-02-2016, 01:59 PM
Last Post: I KEEP MY SECRETS
  Hear me all and listen good TheBearStoleMyPicnic 11 2,829 08-25-2016, 01:13 AM
Last Post: Mach_10
  LISTEN JamLady 20 7,463 05-29-2016, 02:45 PM
Last Post: deb
  So hear me all! will197532 6 2,495 01-10-2016, 01:52 AM
Last Post: Windy City

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)
Contact Us | ChaseChat - Forrest Fenn's Forum | Return to Top | | Lite (Archive) Mode | RSS Syndication