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mdavis19

Well, I just got back home after searching a couple of areas while traveling between my homes in Florida and Arizona and back again. Once again I came up empty, but this time I really felt like I was on the right track, but just missed the target. I learned a couple of things on this trip.



#1. You simply can't trust Google Earth. One of my spots differed radically on the ground from the Google Earth imagery. The imagery date was less than one year old, but conditions on the ground were radically different from the images. I didn't see how it was possible for things to change so much in less than a year. Trails that were clearly visible in the imagery were totally over-grown and impassable, when they could even be located at all. The only conclusion I could come up with is that the imagery date is wrong, and is actually at least several years old, and maybe even older.



#2. The Forest Service has stopped maintaining a lot of lightly used roads. A lot of roads are cut by washouts or blocked by fallen trees, and nobody has been fixing them. One of my spots was at the end of an old mining road. The road had obviously been washed out by a flash flood several years ago and never repaired. There was no way to get past the washed out section except on foot, and even that was difficult as the washout was actually a fairly deep and wide canyon. I hiked to the end of the road. Everything fit my interpretation of the poem, but there was no blaze and no treasure. Another road was blocked by a huge pine tree that had fallen. The tree had to be at least six feet in diameter, and it looked like it had been there for a long while. Due to thick forest and heavy brush on both sides of the road, the only way forward was to bushwhack around it on foot.



Due to the bad condition of a lot of the roads, I now believe that Forrest is correct in his assertion that the treasure won't be found by accident. Especially if he had any advance knowledge of which roads would no longer be maintained. He could be reasonably certain that if he hid the treasure at the end of one of those roads there would be no easy way to get to it after a couple of years.



mdavis19





<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from mdavis19 on October 13, 2013, 10:44 pm</b>

Well, I just got back home after searching a couple of areas while traveling between my homes in Florida and Arizona and back again. Once again I came up empty, but this time I really felt like I was on the right track, but just missed the target. I learned a couple of things on this trip.



#1. You simply can't trust Google Earth. One of my spots differed radically on the ground from the Google Earth imagery. The imagery date was less than one year old, but conditions on the ground were radically different from the images. I didn't see how it was possible for things to change so much in less than a year. Trails that were clearly visible in the imagery were totally over-grown and impassable, when they could even be located at all. The only conclusion I could come up with is that the imagery date is wrong, and is actually at least several years old, and maybe even older.



#2. The Forest Service has stopped maintaining a lot of lightly used roads. A lot of roads are cut by washouts or blocked by fallen trees, and nobody has been fixing them. One of my spots was at the end of an old mining road. The road had obviously been washed out by a flash flood several years ago and never repaired. There was no way to get past the washed out section except on foot, and even that was difficult as the washout was actually a fairly deep and wide canyon. I hiked to the end of the road. Everything fit my interpretation of the poem, but there was no blaze and no treasure. Another road was blocked by a huge pine tree that had fallen. The tree had to be at least six feet in diameter, and it looked like it had been there for a long while. Due to thick forest and heavy brush on both sides of the road, the only way forward was to bushwhack around it on foot.



Due to the bad condition of a lot of the roads, I now believe that Forrest is correct in his assertion that the treasure won't be found by accident. Especially if he had any advance knowledge of which roads would no longer be maintained. He could be reasonably certain that if he hid the treasure at the end of one of those roads there would be no easy way to get to it after a couple of years.



mdavis19


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Google earth is sometimes just wrong period. I had a search area for a while hat GE showed a road to. There was trail but there was never a road in that area. GE shows a road going over a steep cliff. I figured there must have been a switchback or something. I finally explored that place. I scrambled down that cliff but no vehicle ever drove down it. No way no how.



I've also wondered about changing road conditions. THere are also areas on public land but the only way to drive anywhere close to them is through private land. Land owners change their minds about letting people use their roads. Yesterday I got permission from a land owner to go and mess around on his land. Other times I've been denied requests for permission to use various roads. Saturday's spot didn't work out with my daughter and wife so we didn't get to do the search that I wanted. Maybe I'll try tomorrow if it doesn't snow tonight.
GE gives a fair "crow flies" distance over mountains. It doesn't drill through the mountain and give the straight line distance, but you can almost never travel the crow flies distance in the mountains. They do have the "path" feature so that you can follow the distance along a path. You select a bunch of points on the path and it adds up the crow flies distance between each consecutive pair of points. That is pretty accurate.
For what it's worth...I use wunderground maps on google...get rid of the weather info then pan the maps to any area I want to look at nationwide...Zoom is pretty good though close resolution suffers sometimes, and you have the choice of satellite, terrain, and hybrid maps with overlay...Does all I need to look around, even found my home and can see autos and people now and then...can't know the age of the mapping though.
Hi mdavis, have you tried Google earth? There's an elevation feature, you can see the elevation difference between the floor of a valley, and the top of a ridge, it gives a good 3d idea of the terrain.

mdavis19



<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from James Perotti on October 14, 2013, 3:01 pm</b>

Hi mdavis, have you tried Google earth? There's an elevation feature, you can see the elevation difference between the floor of a valley, and the top of a ridge, it gives a good 3d idea of the terrain.
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Yes I have. As I stated above, my problem with Google Earth is that the imagery date doesn't seem to be reliable. The image supposedly less than a year old clearly shows nice obvious trails, but on the ground everything is hopelessly overgrown and impassable. That couldn't have happened in less than one year. The only conclusion that seems to work is that the imagery is actually several or even many years old.



The other issue with cut or blocked roads is going to be difficult see at the resolution of Google Earth, especially in heavily wooded areas with an overhead tree canopy like I was searching in.



mdavis19
mdavis I feel your pain ,better luck next go round
GE does have a date feature. It is the little clock icon. In my area they have seven images going back to 1997. Urban areas seem to have a lot more.
Good lesson to be had here for 2019:

1) Get off Google Earth!!!!
Searchers have one job and one job only. Decide what your WWH is going to be. That’s it! Nothing else! Once you’ve decided what that is, pick one (remember there are many), then pick your canyon. Once you have those two GET OFF THE INTERNET! Grab a map, plan your route, and drive down the canyon. If nothing stands out during that drive pick a different WWWH and canyon.

2) With the government shutdown (there will be a other this year) parks and road will be the worst we’ve seen, so choice your vehicle wisely this year.

And by all means if you disagree with #1 your more than welcome to email f about it. If my words aren’t enough to steal you in this right direction, he would say the same thing and hopefully that’s enough confirmation for you.