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!st Stanza?
08-13-2017, 07:21 PM,
#21
RE: !st Stanza?
(08-13-2017, 09:38 AM)Jack Wrote:
(08-13-2017, 09:25 AM)Challenger11 Wrote:
(08-13-2017, 08:49 AM)Jack Wrote: Umbra asked:
Sounds like a solid system but history is vast, even just in the Rockies. What points to a specific story, or where do you even start looking for one that's a match? Of course if we can't point to a specific story, we at least need a specific person to start with. Sure, there's Meek, and Journal of a Trapper... stuff like that, but it's still a lot to sift through.

Find the place to start, the first clue. It is the question in stanza 5. Who in the Rockies, would be asking that question and then telling his/her story?

Stanza 5 leads to WWWH. So you're saying it also solves the questions of stanza 1?

Yes. Who is the narrator of the second story? The other "I" asking the question in stanza 5 and referred to in stanza 1. Two voices singing the same song but starting at different places. Once you know that,then you know the two people who can keep the secret and one of them is dead. He can only speak through the poet and he wants us to hear me all and listen good.

And I don't know how it can be anyone outside of John Colter Smile

Alone, hear me all, worth the cold, in the wood.

Ernest Tubb's poker stanza (which is same rhyme scheme) says there are 5 people in the poem IMO. You're the wild card.
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08-14-2017, 01:19 AM, (This post was last modified: 08-14-2017, 01:35 AM by Umbra.)
#22
RE: !st Stanza?
(08-13-2017, 08:49 AM)Jack Wrote: Umbra asked:
Sounds like a solid system but history is vast, even just in the Rockies. What points to a specific story, or where do you even start looking for one that's a match? Of course if we can't point to a specific story, we at least need a specific person to start with. Sure, there's Meek, and Journal of a Trapper... stuff like that, but it's still a lot to sift through.

Find the place to start, the first clue. It is the question in stanza 5. Who in the Rockies, would be asking that question and then telling his/her story?

Seems like quite a few people really. It could have been anyone involved in Yellowstone Park, the discoverer, the first to tell of or publish it, the President, or anyone involved with making it a national park; any outlaw who ever committed a robbery and hid treasure in the Rockies; and probably anyone with any other sort of thing left behind that could be called a treasure, it could even have been Forrest's father who left his kids and/or students to seek life and more learning. Like I said the scope is pretty large.

(08-12-2017, 04:50 PM)Buddy Allen Wrote: I think one of the things stanza one is telling you is that you need to pay attention to tenses. We have been told that wwwh is clue one, and that it is the hardest and most important, but not to disregard anything. Stanza four is almost parenthetical, you can't do it until after five and six. Another reminder to look close at tenses.
That seemed to make a lot of sense
Next time I read I will look at the tense


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08-14-2017, 02:24 AM,
#23
RE: !st Stanza?
(08-13-2017, 07:21 PM)realistrealist Wrote: And I don't know how it can be anyone outside of John Colter Smile

Alone, hear me all, worth the cold, in the wood.

Ernest Tubb's poker stanza (which is same rhyme scheme) says there are 5 people in the poem IMO. You're the wild card.
Well, in all honesty, Real, I think "alone, hear me all, worth the cold, in the wood", could apply to anyone lost in the woods in winter and crying for help. Lets even throw in a reward he's offering to make it worth the cold.

The poker idea seems to have much more validity, but I'm not sure which stanza that is or how it points to 5 people, aside from the song lyrics and the way Fenn altered it in the book as a quote.

If you have more to go on and want to share, please do, because I missed this so I'm sure I missed other things.
Reply
08-14-2017, 01:06 PM, (This post was last modified: 08-14-2017, 01:32 PM by Umbra.)
#24
RE: !st Stanza?
(08-14-2017, 09:29 AM)realistrealist Wrote:
(08-14-2017, 02:24 AM)Umbra Wrote:
(08-13-2017, 07:21 PM)realistrealist Wrote: And I don't know how it can be anyone outside of John Colter Smile

Alone, hear me all, worth the cold, in the wood.

Ernest Tubb's poker stanza (which is same rhyme scheme) says there are 5 people in the poem IMO. You're the wild card.
Well, in all honesty, Real, I think "alone, hear me all, worth the cold, in the wood", could apply to anyone lost in the woods in winter and crying for help. Lets even throw in a reward he's offering to make it worth the cold.

The poker idea seems to have much more validity, but I'm not sure which stanza that is or how it points to 5 people, aside from the song lyrics and the way Fenn altered it in the book as a quote.

If you have more to go on and want to share, please do, because I missed this so I'm sure I missed other things.

Colter is the simplest person it would apply to from my reading so far especially if YNP is indeed where the chest is; I don't know of anyone that went into the region by themselves like Colter - alone in the harsh winter and not believed despite telling his story over and over. Colter's Pass happening to be named after him north of Cooke City which was a "mineral rich area" "known as the New World Mining District" is a nice coincidence.

I've described what I believe everything is. There are 5 personas in the poem with you being the final one. Fenn, Colter, Belle, and Belle's father being the others. The epilogue tells you about how as he is looking back at his history it appears he was different people and Mindy and others have spoken about some of this at long depth.

I wasn't aware of Belle or the father. I can't be expected to read everything everyone ever wrote about this, so thanks for pointing it out or I probably would have continued to miss it. I can't lend an opinion since it's all new to me, but I'll have a look. I thought about Colter early on and decided it was vague, so it went on a back burner and I never revisited him. Thanks again.

(08-14-2017, 05:12 AM)fallingrock Wrote: I do believe this stanza holds the word that is key. By saying "and hint" I believe he is hinting of riches at the location he can keep his secret. I feel like the more we mess with his poem the colder we are going to get. If your search yields obvious signs, chances are, you messed with his poem.

I found some obvious signs without messing with anything at all. I wish there were a way for me to explain it without giving it all away, but there isn't. It's very straight forward, confidence instilling, and pinpoint accurate as far as a physical location goes. My best guess is that it puts you there to follow more clues to a map.

I think a lot of people are generally on the right track to an extent, but missing the mark by a long ways because of...

Damnit! I just realized I can't even really say why. I'm really sorry guys, I would love to share it, I really would, but don't want to lose the advantage I'd have it it proved to be correct, and it would be a huge one. This particular solution seems to fit what Forrest said about the first clue and word that is key. I have other good solutions and some I like better, but this one is impossible to ignore.

Anyways, point is that I really feel there is a clue that is blatant and I'd encourage people to look for that. You won't have much doubt if you find it. I will say again though that it is contingent on something I can't confirm, but that makes it in no way vague or doubtful.

Okay, not finding anything on a Belle, except for a Libby Wakefield.
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08-14-2017, 03:52 PM,
#25
RE: !st Stanza?
So Belle is the character in Beauty and the Beast named after this ship, or vice versa? That's an interesting take on it. I'll never get my reading list done this way, but I am always interested in new info. Tongue
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08-15-2017, 01:47 AM,
#26
RE: !st Stanza?
Fenn has daughters, there might be something too it.
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08-15-2017, 01:53 PM,
#27
RE: !st Stanza?
(08-14-2017, 09:29 AM)realistrealist Wrote:
(08-14-2017, 02:24 AM)Umbra Wrote:
(08-13-2017, 07:21 PM)realistrealist Wrote: And I don't know how it can be anyone outside of John Colter Smile

Alone, hear me all, worth the cold, in the wood.

Ernest Tubb's poker stanza (which is same rhyme scheme) says there are 5 people in the poem IMO. You're the wild card.
Well, in all honesty, Real, I think "alone, hear me all, worth the cold, in the wood", could apply to anyone lost in the woods in winter and crying for help. Lets even throw in a reward he's offering to make it worth the cold.

The poker idea seems to have much more validity, but I'm not sure which stanza that is or how it points to 5 people, aside from the song lyrics and the way Fenn altered it in the book as a quote.

If you have more to go on and want to share, please do, because I missed this so I'm sure I missed other things.

Colter is the simplest person it would apply to from my reading so far especially if YNP is indeed where the chest is; I don't know of anyone that went into the region by themselves like Colter - alone in the harsh winter and not believed despite telling his story over and over. Colter's Pass happening to be named after him north of Cooke City which was a "mineral rich area" "known as the New World Mining District" is a nice coincidence.

I've described what I believe everything is. There are 5 personas in the poem with you being the final one. Fenn, Colter, Belle, and Belle's father being the others. The epilogue tells you about how as he is looking back at his history it appears he was different people and Mindy and others have spoken about some of this at long depth.

The chest isnt in yellowstone. He said its not in close proximity to a human trail, in another interview he said yellowstone is one of the places you DO NOT leave the trails... Pretty straightforward with that statement. But hey, its your time and money youre burnin so thats on you and whomever else thinks its in yellowstone
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08-15-2017, 02:46 PM,
#28
RE: !st Stanza?
(08-15-2017, 01:53 PM)McFly Wrote:
(08-14-2017, 09:29 AM)realistrealist Wrote:
(08-14-2017, 02:24 AM)Umbra Wrote:
(08-13-2017, 07:21 PM)realistrealist Wrote: And I don't know how it can be anyone outside of John Colter :)

Alone, hear me all, worth the cold, in the wood.

Ernest Tubb's poker stanza (which is same rhyme scheme) says there are 5 people in the poem IMO. You're the wild card.
Well, in all honesty, Real, I think "alone, hear me all, worth the cold, in the wood", could apply to anyone lost in the woods in winter and crying for help. Lets even throw in a reward he's offering to make it worth the cold.

The poker idea seems to have much more validity, but I'm not sure which stanza that is or how it points to 5 people, aside from the song lyrics and the way Fenn altered it in the book as a quote.

If you have more to go on and want to share, please do, because I missed this so I'm sure I missed other things.

Colter is the simplest person it would apply to from my reading so far especially if YNP is indeed where the chest is; I don't know of anyone that went into the region by themselves like Colter - alone in the harsh winter and not believed despite telling his story over and over. Colter's Pass happening to be named after him north of Cooke City which was a "mineral rich area" "known as the New World Mining District" is a nice coincidence.

I've described what I believe everything is. There are 5 personas in the poem with you being the final one. Fenn, Colter, Belle, and Belle's father being the others. The epilogue tells you about how as he is looking back at his history it appears he was different people and Mindy and others have spoken about some of this at long depth.

The chest isnt in yellowstone. He said its not in close proximity to a human trail, in another interview he said yellowstone is one of the places you DO NOT leave the trails... Pretty straightforward with that statement. But hey, its your time and money youre burnin so thats on you and whomever else thinks its in yellowstone

1. Really? Where is it, I'll go get it.
2. I didn't say anything about a trail.
3. He did not say that, you should look up the definition of however and his more recent reply about hiking off-trail in YNP before making blanket statements
4. It could easily be in a parking lot if there are indeed faux directions in poem that you aren't meant to follow.

If you want help looking elsewhere, let me know.
Reply
08-15-2017, 05:12 PM,
#29
!st Stanza?
(08-15-2017, 01:53 PM)McFly Wrote:
(08-14-2017, 09:29 AM)realistrealist Wrote:
(08-14-2017, 02:24 AM)Umbra Wrote:
(08-13-2017, 07:21 PM)realistrealist Wrote: And I don't know how it can be anyone outside of John Colter Smile

Alone, hear me all, worth the cold, in the wood.

Ernest Tubb's poker stanza (which is same rhyme scheme) says there are 5 people in the poem IMO. You're the wild card.
Well, in all honesty, Real, I think "alone, hear me all, worth the cold, in the wood", could apply to anyone lost in the woods in winter and crying for help. Lets even throw in a reward he's offering to make it worth the cold.

The poker idea seems to have much more validity, but I'm not sure which stanza that is or how it points to 5 people, aside from the song lyrics and the way Fenn altered it in the book as a quote.

If you have more to go on and want to share, please do, because I missed this so I'm sure I missed other things.

Colter is the simplest person it would apply to from my reading so far especially if YNP is indeed where the chest is; I don't know of anyone that went into the region by themselves like Colter - alone in the harsh winter and not believed despite telling his story over and over. Colter's Pass happening to be named after him north of Cooke City which was a "mineral rich area" "known as the New World Mining District" is a nice coincidence.

I've described what I believe everything is. There are 5 personas in the poem with you being the final one. Fenn, Colter, Belle, and Belle's father being the others. The epilogue tells you about how as he is looking back at his history it appears he was different people and Mindy and others have spoken about some of this at long depth.

The chest isnt in yellowstone. He said its not in close proximity to a human trail, in another interview he said yellowstone is one of the places you DO NOT leave the trails... Pretty straightforward with that statement. But hey, its your time and money youre burnin so thats on you and whomever else thinks its in yellowstone


A quote about not going off the trail in Yellowstone? Do you have the link?


Kpro

Email: kpro3@aol.com
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08-15-2017, 06:43 PM,
#30
!st Stanza?
Thank you ws. The context of the paragraph makes the notion that Ff says not to go off trail in Yellowstone inaccurate.


Kpro

Email: kpro3@aol.com
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