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Fenn's perfect trap
05-11-2019, 10:42 AM, (This post was last modified: 05-11-2019, 10:46 AM by Top Secret.)
#1
Fenn's perfect trap
Many have marvelled over Fenn's ability to appeal to the red neck and the smartest of the smart and yet the poem remains unsolved. Assuming there is a treasure to be found, how is it that he was able to create such a masterpiece that attracts such a wide variety of people and still remains unsolved?

Fenn is a marketer and as such knows how to motivate people to buy from him. The treasure hunt is no different, we are buying this story and he found a way to motivate the entire spectrum of intelligence. Normally something this hard would only be accepted by the James Holtzowers of the world, but what about those red necks, what motivates them?

Well Fenn certainly tries to claim he is just a simple guy and does relate extremely well to the simplest of simple people, but it is his poem that does the work for him. Those who just look at he poem and only the poem will see simple words that appear simple to solve and that is where Fenn's magic goes to work.

There are 166 words of which at least 118 of those words have at least two possible definitions possible and many of those words have over 10 different ways to interpret them let alone the possibility there are homophones (listen good) as a possibility.

When you run the permutations and combinations of word definition possibilities you have odds that are much more remote than Power Ball. Yet a simple person just sees simple words with simple definitions and can easily create a solve which will allow them to participate and meet Fenn's ultimate goal - get people into the mountains and give them hope.

Some searchers who are slightly smarter than your average simple searcher will be able to spin off solves by the hundreds because they have a near infinite word definition base of which to find a possible solution.

Sure the Ken Jennings out there, realized the real odds of solving such a vague and cleverly crafted puzzle as next to impossible, and stayed far away. But those people are few and far between, Fenn knew he wasn't going to catch all the fish, but just enough to keep him full for the rest of his life.

Well done Fenn on building the ultimate trap!
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05-11-2019, 12:16 PM, (This post was last modified: 05-11-2019, 12:23 PM by Top Secret.)
#2
RE: Fenn's perfect trap
(05-11-2019, 11:28 AM)SimonSays Wrote: It's simple. You have the talkers, and the listeners. A talker, like yourself, will never solve the poem. You're too busy marveling at your own thoughts and ideas. Kind of reminds me of a pontificating youtuber.

Yes me is a talker just like you SimpleSimonSays We both don’t have a chance
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05-11-2019, 01:31 PM, (This post was last modified: 05-11-2019, 01:58 PM by Top Secret.)
#3
RE: Fenn's perfect trap
I noticed Fenn told dal to post a fenntube about the comparison to the Rubics cube. I think this example is close to what I have illustrated here. The Rubics cube has a 9 squares (like there are 9 clues) and each layer of the cube represents different possibilities for each clue. The Rubics cube has 43 252 003 274 489 856 000 combinations. Yup 43 quintillion possibilities. Yet it is solvable with the right technique, call it the key. Without the key, imagine yourself blind randomly twisting the cube hoping to solve it like random monkeys pounding on a typewriter hoping to produce the ultimate novel. It just ain’t going to happen.


Fenn was smart he set it up to make it look easy because like lotteries they prey on those who are bad at math.

The power ball is approx 292 million combinations that is 148 trillion times better than solving the tunics cube blind folded.


Is that not interesting how Fenn is talking about being blind lately?
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05-11-2019, 02:16 PM,
#4
Fenn's perfect trap
You have to find where the edges are, right. The problem with the rubics cube analogy is that a child can solve it.

Everything he has said about the chase, aside from show the poem to a child, is that kids can’t get past the first two clues, or a three year old girl would need some help.

I’ve watched two of my child’s classmates, 7th graders, solve a rubics cube in under two minutes. It’s totally mechanical and once you understand the method that solves it, it’s a no-brainer.

Now, if it’s the three dimensionality of the solution that’s important, then he’s already hinted at that with his SB Libation, Nada, Awe - multiple perspective artwork.


razyfamily
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05-11-2019, 03:02 PM, (This post was last modified: 05-11-2019, 03:08 PM by Top Secret.)
#5
RE: Fenn's perfect trap
(05-11-2019, 02:16 PM)crazyfamily Wrote: You have to find where the edges are, right. The problem with the rubics cube analogy is that a child can solve it.

Everything he has said about the chase, aside from show the poem to a child, is that kids can’t get past the first two clues, or a three year old girl would need some help.

I’ve watched two of my child’s classmates, 7th graders, solve a rubics cube in under two minutes. It’s totally mechanical and once you understand the method that solves it, it’s a no-brainer.

Now, if it’s the three dimensionality of the solution that’s important, then he’s already hinted at that with his SB Libation, Nada, Awe - multiple perspective artwork.


razyfamily
You know crazy family, after listening to your explanation I believe the Rubics cube analogy is an excellent description of this chase. I believe everyone is blindly spinning the tumblers hoping for a solution. I believe they are doing it blindfolded if that helps make the oft more understandable. If one has the technique or key to Solve it, then yes a child can solve it or most who learn the technique can do it.

Everyone is thinking that random fits to the words will produce a treasure. But the only solution that leads to the treasure has to be solved with the proper technique and that technique is not easy to discover. Once discovered then most of the masses may be able to understand it, but they do not have a hope in hell of figuring it out on their own. Only a genius will be able to do that.
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05-11-2019, 04:30 PM,
#6
RE: Fenn's perfect trap
(05-11-2019, 03:28 PM)NTMI Wrote:
(05-11-2019, 03:02 PM)Top Secret Wrote:
(05-11-2019, 02:16 PM)crazyfamily Wrote: You have to find where the edges are, right. The problem with the rubics cube analogy is that a child can solve it.

Everything he has said about the chase, aside from show the poem to a child, is that kids can’t get past the first two clues, or a three year old girl would need some help.

I’ve watched two of my child’s classmates, 7th graders, solve a rubics cube in under two minutes. It’s totally mechanical and once you understand the method that solves it, it’s a no-brainer.

Now, if it’s the three dimensionality of the solution that’s important, then he’s already hinted at that with his SB Libation, Nada, Awe - multiple perspective artwork.


razyfamily
You know crazy family, after listening to your explanation I believe the Rubics cube analogy is an excellent description of this chase. I believe everyone is blindly spinning the tumblers hoping for a solution. I believe they are doing it blindfolded if that helps make the oft more understandable. If one has the technique or key to Solve it, then yes a child can solve it or most who learn the technique can do it.

Everyone is thinking that random fits to the words will produce a treasure. But the only solution that leads to the treasure has to be solved with the proper technique and that technique is not easy to discover. Once discovered then most of the masses may be able to understand it, but they do not have a hope in hell of figuring it out on their own. Only a genius will be able to do that.

(05-11-2019, 03:02 PM)Top Secret Wrote:
(05-11-2019, 02:16 PM)crazyfamily Wrote: You have to find where the edges are, right. The problem with the rubics cube analogy is that a child can solve it.

Everything he has said about the chase, aside from show the poem to a child, is that kids can’t get past the first two clues, or a three year old girl would need some help.

I’ve watched two of my child’s classmates, 7th graders, solve a rubics cube in under two minutes. It’s totally mechanical and once you understand the method that solves it, it’s a no-brainer.

Now, if it’s the three dimensionality of the solution that’s important, then he’s already hinted at that with his SB Libation, Nada, Awe - multiple perspective artwork.


razyfamily
You know crazy family, after listening to your explanation I believe the Rubics cube analogy is an excellent description of this chase. I believe everyone is blindly spinning the tumblers hoping for a solution. I believe they are doing it blindfolded if that helps make the oft more understandable. If one has the technique or key to Solve it, then yes a child can solve it or most who learn the technique can do it.

Everyone is thinking that random fits to the words will produce a treasure. But the only solution that leads to the treasure has to be solved with the proper technique and that technique is not easy to discover. Once discovered then most of the masses may be able to understand it, but they do not have a hope in hell of figuring it out on their own. Only a genius will be able to do that.
With my arthritic hands, I can still “solve” the cube in about 2-1/2 minutes, but I’m no closer to solving the chase puzzle than you good folks...

That’s because us good folks are randomly sounding it with a blind fold on. We need guys like. You to teach us the technique so we can take the blind fold off. What say you!?
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05-11-2019, 05:38 PM,
#7
RE: Fenn's perfect trap
The question is if you had a tunic cube for every possible combination how high would they stack?
261 light years high. That makes power ball odds look like a coin flip. Fenn’s poem has more possibilities than that.
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05-11-2019, 07:08 PM,
#8
RE: Fenn's perfect trap
(05-11-2019, 05:38 PM)Top Secret Wrote: The question is if you had a tunic cube for every possible combination how high would they stack?
261 light years high. That makes power ball odds look like a coin flip. Fenn’s poem has more possibilities than that.

I prefer 285 light years, a little further drive but a much better view.
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05-11-2019, 08:19 PM, (This post was last modified: 05-11-2019, 08:19 PM by crazyfamily.)
#9
Fenn's perfect trap
Are you trying to solve the poem or write a thesis?


razyfamily
Reply
05-12-2019, 08:29 AM,
#10
RE: Fenn's perfect trap
Many are speculating that Fenn's pointing to the Rubic's cube is another signal for searchers to get back into the box (cube). There was one other time Fenn outright told searchers to get back in the box, when Mike Davis was preaching to think outside the box.

I think this latest hint is a nod to my Fenn Failure box list below:

[Image: Slide1.jpg]

Or a hint no to listen to failures in this box. Thanks Fenn, I am here to help.
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