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Solving the first two clues
05-16-2019, 10:39 AM, (This post was last modified: 05-16-2019, 10:45 AM by filmguy.)
#1
Solving the first two clues
Let's take a look at the first two clues.
Let's see if we can solve them without specialty knowledge or any out-of-the-box thinking.

Fenn's comments have made it very clear that the internet and/or map isn't going to be much help after these first two clues.
Evidence: "Rocking chair ideas can lead one to the first few clues, but a physical presence is needed to complete the solve." ~ Mysterious Writing
"The little girl in India cannot get closer than the first two clues." ~ Mysterious Writing
And I've read it somewhere that the poem can be solved using a map without any names ~ Lost the known source

If these comments are to be believed then it's clear "home of Brown" isn't anything you can research or find on a map. Instead this could be the clue designed to use your imagination. The gotcha or catch-all that makes the treasure more difficult to find even after having the previous clues correct.

So, if we are given a map with no names and possess general knowledge of geography can we solve the first two clues?

What if WWWH is as simple as the mountains? What if canyon down is as simple as an actual canyon that travels down a mountain (yet, one big enough to be noticeable on a map - think Rio Grande Gorge or Grand Canyon of Yellowstone)? How can you tell if a canyon is going down or going up? Elevation research? How about you just look to see which direction the water in the canyon is flowing? If the answer to these questions is yes, then how would we have the correct mountains? After all there are many WWWH (mountains) in the Rockies, and most of them are north of Santa Fe.
Evidence: "“There are many places in the Rocky Mountains where warm waters halt, and nearly all of them are north of Santa Fe. Look at the big picture, there are no short cuts.” ~ Mysterious Writings

I believe the answer is in the next clue:
Not far, but too far to walk.
If you think about it, this is the only specific clue in the poem.
But what could it mean?
Is it a coincidence that the book is only sold in one specific store?
Could this clue be referring to where you just bought the book?
That the treasure is not far from the Collected Works Book Store, but too far to walk?
If true, wouldn't it be clear that the Sangre de Cristo mountains fit the definition of a place where warm water (rain) halts (turns to snow)? From Santa Fe, these mountains are right next door to 100+ miles. Sounds like a place that is too far to walk, but easily driving distance.

Now we just need to drive around the base, using our imagination, and looking for something that stands out as "home of Brown"
This is why searchers are getting the first two clues right, but driving past the others. They have been using specialized knowledge and internet research to take them to a specific location, instead of looking at the first two clues to take them to a general location and then using their imagination to take them the rest of the way.
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05-16-2019, 10:49 AM,
#2
RE: Solving the first two clues
"Fenn's comments have made it very clear that the internet and/or map isn't going to be much help after these first two clues."

That would fit right along with the sudden thought I had the other day on my drive to work about a possible solution to heavy loads/waters high.
"waterlogged" came to mind as I was trying to get the water out of my ear from my morning shower. After I had thought that to myself, my mind immediately said "heavy loads, water high?"

The logging industry, which became very popular in the rockies produce many heavy loads of lumber.
High water are the signs road crews use to notify drivers of slightly flooded roadways.

So the area mentioned in the line could be a swampy type area, which wouldn't be named on a map...
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05-16-2019, 11:12 AM, (This post was last modified: 05-16-2019, 11:13 AM by filmguy.)
#3
RE: Solving the first two clues
Interesting you use the word "swampy."
One of my favorite resting places for the chest is in the middle of a swamp. Something ankle high that takes a little bravery to walk in and get your feet wet. A place that guarantees the humidity would cause the chest to be "wet." And a place that after a 100 year or so will dry up, making the chest easier for future generations to stumble onto, but very unlikely today.
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05-16-2019, 02:25 PM,
#4
RE: Solving the first two clues
A swamp would also be consistent with Fenn's frogs and dragon flies. I don't personally think it is in a swamp, but Gordon Lightfoot's 5-hour solution led him to one.
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05-16-2019, 03:02 PM,
#5
RE: Solving the first two clues
You must look at the physical historical plates in your search area; not the general area but in a more specific roadside pull-off. Photograph all you find, even as far away from your targeted area as 60-70 miles. Put them in folders listed as Route 13, Route 110, etc. or in each park you are in. You may get a surprise when home of Brown just falls in your lap. Read every shred of history, geological surveys, elevation markers, airplane routes, former or present rich deposits of minerals (gold, silver, copper, mangenese, sulfur, and on and on) or oil or rare earths being or has been removed. Put this information into your folders where you put the photographs. Notebooks seemed difficult for me as my mind is a little slower than some; I use the computer to sort however I need in a database.
Now find out about Skippy (the god) and where he is reported to be now... IMO...
just saying ss
Reply
05-16-2019, 06:30 PM,
#6
Solving the first two clues
(05-16-2019, 10:49 AM)kaotkbliss Wrote: "Fenn's comments have made it very clear that the internet and/or map isn't going to be much help after these first two clues."

Which comments are those?



razyfamily
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05-16-2019, 07:42 PM,
#7
RE: Solving the first two clues
(05-16-2019, 03:02 PM)easternOHsteve Wrote: You must look at the physical historical plates in your search area; not the general area but in a more specific roadside pull-off. Photograph all you find, even as far away from your targeted area as 60-70 miles. Put them in folders listed as Route 13, Route 110, etc. or in each park you are in. You may get a surprise when home of Brown just falls in your lap. Read every shred of history, geological surveys, elevation markers, airplane routes, former or present rich deposits of minerals (gold, silver, copper, mangenese, sulfur, and on and on) or oil or rare earths being or has been removed. Put this information into your folders where you put the photographs. Notebooks seemed difficult for me as my mind is a little slower than some; I use the computer to sort however I need in a database.
Now find out about Skippy (the god) and where he is reported to be now... IMO...

That is excellent advice I will have to remember when I start my BOTG, photograph everything to review later if I come back empty-handed Smile
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05-17-2019, 10:41 AM, (This post was last modified: 05-17-2019, 10:48 AM by filmguy.)
#8
RE: Solving the first two clues
Bump. Because crazyfamily thinks there hasn't been any new ideas in the last 24 hours.
Oh wait, he/she might not be able to see this if they put me on the ignore list.
Well.....their loss. But that's what happens when you're out to pick fights with people. One day you realize there is nobody around anymore.

(05-16-2019, 02:25 PM)Beavertooth Wrote: A swamp would also be consistent with Fenn's frogs and dragon flies. I don't personally think it is in a swamp, but Gordon Lightfoot's 5-hour solution led him to one.

I forgot what recent quote or email convinced me its not in a swamp, but it's still an intriguing idea. If I ever come across a swamp in my hunt I may have to venture through if I see anything that "stands out."
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05-17-2019, 03:34 PM,
#9
RE: Solving the first two clues
@kaotkbliss
My theory of heavy loads and water high:
You have an idea where to go to follow the last few feet or mile or whatever you choose as the last important distance.
You are walking along on the "path" looking around, up and down. You come up a bank in the roadway and you suddenly see a grayish white banana ahead consisting of trillions of tons of these various sized tarry rocks maybe two or three thousand feet above your location. You need field glasses or have researched the area and BOTG some maybe? to know there are streams emitting from this white-topped rock system.
Now:
Look quickly down.
just saying ss
Reply


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