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Letter sent to Forrest...
06-22-2019, 09:43 AM,
#1
Letter sent to Forrest...
Hy Guys, I had sent an email to Forrest but did not get a response. So I thought I would post it here because someone might have some thoughts and tips?

Dear Forrest,
We will be headed to our search area on the 28th of June. Will be our little family of 4. I am trying to ask a question on the basis of keeping my family safe and out of trouble. From what we have read in your poem and other places…

1. If you've been brave and in the wood.
2. Not off or near a man made trail.
3. Not near a man made structure.
4. People would not likely run across it by accident because people don't
go to that place.

Here is my question based on the above.

Would this location be on public land that we can get to over public land,
or is it necessary to walk into an area that would be considered off limits
or trespassing to get to the public land?

Also, if you were me as a father…going into the woods with my wife, 2 girls (11 and 13)
what would you take with you on the hike. You have experience in the woods and I'm new at this. What should I take as protection, hiking tools etc?

Thanks,
Dan
Reply
06-22-2019, 10:28 AM, (This post was last modified: 06-22-2019, 02:49 PM by Milan.)
#2
RE: Letter sent to Forrest...
My thoughts:

1. Don't trespass. There's no reason to do so, and it could lead to a dangerous situation.
2. Learn the basics on hiking/camping safety. Water, shelter, first aid kits, etc. Information from the experts can be found all over the internet.
3. Consider carrying bear spray.
4. Know your limits, and err on the side of caution. DO NOT CROSS ANY RAPIDLY MOVING WATER SOURCES, and don't set up camp where flash floods are a possibility.
5. Let friends or family know the approximate location you will be and when you expect to be back. Let them be your safety net for checking in with them.
6. Do not rely on a cell phone. It will probably be useless out there or the battery won't last long enough.

In essence, be smart and be prepared.

Good luck, and have a great time!

Milan
Reply
06-22-2019, 10:55 AM,
#3
RE: Letter sent to Forrest...
Forrest can't answer those sorts of public land/private land questions. Milan's remarks were good.

If you are camping in the back country be especially wary of the possibility of flash floods. Even highly experienced campers have been known to screw up and get swept away. Being trapped in a tent that is getting carried away by floodwaters is something I hope never to experience. This is a wet year. Waters are higher than normal. I was recently trapped behind low water crossings for several days in a 4WD that I was afraid to drive back across what was normally a 6" deep creek crossing. Normally 2WD highway cars can drive in there. I went in one morning and spent the night. The water rose over night to the point I was afraid to cross it in my little truck. Eventually someone drove in in a large Ford and I drove out behind him without incident. Funny huh. I forded the stream with the help of a Ford.

Also, people are known to put up private property/no trespassing signs on public land, so you might need to know who really owns the land you're going on. I routinely go on land that is posted "no trespassing" because I know the land behind the fence with the no trespassing signs is MY LAND and YOUR LAND and decidedly not the private property of the rich guy who had his minions post the illegal signs. If this is an issue for you I recommend you get an account on Onx. https://webmap.onxmaps.com/login.html There is far too much theft of public land by wealthy landowners in the west.
Reply
06-22-2019, 11:49 AM,
#4
RE: Letter sent to Forrest...
(06-22-2019, 10:28 AM)Milan Wrote: My thoughts:

1. Don't trespass. There's no reason to do so, and it could lead to a dangerous situation.
2. Learn the basics on hiking/camping safety. Water, shelter, first aid kits, etc. Information from the experts can be found all over the internet.
3. Consider carrying bear spray.
4. Know your limits, and error on the side of caution. DO NOT CROSS ANY RAPIDLY MOVING WATER SOURCES, and don't set up camp where flash floods are a possibility.
5. Let friends or family know the approximate location you will be and when you expect to be back. Let them be your safety net for checking in with them.
6. Do not rely on a cell phone. It will probably be useless out there or the battery won't last long enough.

In essence, be smart and be prepared.

Good luck, and have a great time!

Milan


I agree with Milan and would add a couple of items:

1) In addition to friends and family, contact the Ranger Station closest to you hike and let them know when you will be going and when you think you will be returning. Also, contact them to let them know you have finished your hike and are safe back at your vehicle.

2) Related to 1, estimate how long you think you will be and prepare accordingly. If you are new to hiking in the Rockies and live in lower altitudes, it would be a good idea to double the estimate of time you think it will take you to get from Point A to Point B, especially since you will have young children with you and you may want to stop several times to take in the beauty at different spots.

3) Be patient with your kids. Even the most enthusiastic kids may grow weary during your hike. Enjoy the time with them.

4) Watch for afternoon thunderstorms. There is no shortage of lightning in the Rockies in the summer time.

5) Focus on the journey - that itself is a treasure - take photos

Have fun!

Peace,

Inohury
Reply
06-22-2019, 11:50 AM,
#5
RE: Letter sent to Forrest...
One other thing to be wary of that Milan didn't mention is wind. This year there have been exceedingly high winds in the mountains north of Santa Fe. Two full grown Ponderosa pines fell close to my house. I heard a tree fall one morning while out camping. I wasn't sure how close to my tent it landed. A train was blown off the tracks near Tucumcari. That happened in March. These guys say it was a tornado but I'm not sure that is true. I heard there was a tornado in the area but not that it hit that train. https://www.businessbreakingnews.net/201...ew-mexico/
There were many many many trees down in the forests this year.

If the winds are high and the ground is soggy I would wait. People do get killed by falling trees. It really isn't the sort of thing one thinks about that much. It just happens from time to time. This guy says there were 31 deaths per year from 1995 to 2007 caused by wind-driven tree fall. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/dow...1&type=pdf
Reply
06-22-2019, 02:40 PM, (This post was last modified: 06-22-2019, 02:45 PM by brubr.)
#6
RE: Letter sent to Forrest...
(06-22-2019, 10:55 AM)John Brown Wrote: Funny huh. I forded the stream with the help of a Ford.

Not sure why this is funny. My Ford SUV with the off-road tires can handle a great deal. Like the trip I just came back from where I had to use 4x4 low in second gear (for many miles) to keep going and not drive over a cliff. Dang, that was a lot of mud.

To Milan's list, I would also add:

1. Bug spray. The deer flies, mosquitoes, and other flying things are nasty.

2. Long-sleeve shirts and long pants. Going off trail into the brush can turn your skin into hamburger.

3. Hats for everyone. The UV at elevation will do a number on the top of your head where you cant put sunblock.

4. If your girls need to go off into the bushes to relieve themselves, have an adult go with them. Small kids squatting may look like prey to predators like cougar. Just a note from a lone female who always has her back against a tree.
Reply
06-22-2019, 02:55 PM,
#7
RE: Letter sent to Forrest...
(06-22-2019, 10:55 AM)John Brown Wrote: Also, people are known to put up private property/no trespassing signs on public land, so you might need to know who really owns the land you're going on. I routinely go on land that is posted "no trespassing" because I know the land behind the fence with the no trespassing signs is MY LAND and YOUR LAND and decidedly not the private property of the rich guy who had his minions post the illegal signs. If this is an issue for you I recommend you get an account on Onx. https://webmap.onxmaps.com/login.html There is far too much theft of public land by wealthy landowners in the west.

+1 for onxmaps.com
Reply
06-22-2019, 03:53 PM,
#8
RE: Letter sent to Forrest...
I have noticed locked gates on National Forest lands in many areas. I thought public lands were owned by the people. Riches seem to be a means to not go to jail and to keep public lands out of the people's reach. How are we going to counter such corruption? Sorry, I get crazy sometimes.
just saying ss
Reply
06-23-2019, 11:50 AM,
#9
RE: Letter sent to Forrest...
(06-22-2019, 10:55 AM)John Brown Wrote: Forrest can't answer those sorts of public land/private land questions. Milan's remarks were good.

If you are camping in the back country be especially wary of the possibility of flash floods. Even highly experienced campers have been known to screw up and get swept away. Being trapped in a tent that is getting carried away by floodwaters is something I hope never to experience. This is a wet year. Waters are higher than normal. I was recently trapped behind low water crossings for several days in a 4WD that I was afraid to drive back across what was normally a 6" deep creek crossing. Normally 2WD highway cars can drive in there. I went in one morning and spent the night. The water rose over night to the point I was afraid to cross it in my little truck. Eventually someone drove in in a large Ford and I drove out behind him without incident. Funny huh. I forded the stream with the help of a Ford.

Hi John, thanks for the great tips. Just another follow up question. Say we are hiking around in the woods down to a river. Is there a way to know if a flash flood could be on the way from way up stream where it might be raining?

Also, people are known to put up private property/no trespassing signs on public land, so you might need to know who really owns the land you're going on. I routinely go on land that is posted "no trespassing" because I know the land behind the fence with the no trespassing signs is MY LAND and YOUR LAND and decidedly not the private property of the rich guy who had his minions post the illegal signs. If this is an issue for you I recommend you get an account on Onx. https://webmap.onxmaps.com/login.html There is far too much theft of public land by wealthy landowners in the west.
Reply
06-23-2019, 07:35 PM,
#10
RE: Letter sent to Forrest...
If you walk through or search in brush be wary of wood ticks. You may not know you have them on you so when you get home or back to your campsite be sure to strip down and check your whole body and the clothing you wore. Lyme Disease can be deadly.

And if you poke around in places where rodents live be wary of breathing any dust you might stir up. The Hantavirus is no fun.

And of course there is the West Nile Virus carried by mosquitoes.
.
.
These are all just my ideas. I hope no one uses them.
Reply


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