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The Poem’s Word Tricks
07-28-2019, 12:54 PM, (This post was last modified: 07-28-2019, 12:56 PM by astree.)
#1
The Poem’s Word Tricks
.
I think its reasonable to suspect that the poem uses words in a way that are tricky, and may misdirect, if not understood in the way intended.

For example, the lines

“From there, its no place for the meek”

“If you are brave and in the wood”

seem to indicate perilous conditions, yet we ar3 told the chest is not in a dangerous place. (We could reason that there is reference or route interpretation that need not be taken in the retrieval).

Has anyone got other examples?
=====

DON’T RESEARCH...THINK!!!

https://www.allmovie.com/movie/v46056

WP (stock symbol)
.
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07-28-2019, 03:03 PM,
#2
RE: The Poem’s Word Tricks
Ideas

From there = here
Not far = close
Reply
07-28-2019, 03:06 PM,
#3
RE: The Poem’s Word Tricks
I think its reasonable to suspect that the poem uses words in a way that are tricky, and may misdirect, if not understood in the way intended.

For example, the lines

“From there, its no place for the meek”

“If you are brave and in the wood”

seem to indicate perilous conditions, yet we ar3 told the chest is not in a dangerous place. (We could reason that there is reference or route interpretation that need not be taken in the retrieval).

Has anyone got other examples?





Astree,

I agree with "tricky" (although I would use the word clever instead), but not misdirection. I don't believe there is misdirection employed as a device in the poem. There is almost limitless potential for taking the wrong direction or deviating from the correct one even with the correct beginning. But I believe Forrest is telling, not mis-telling.

Regarding your example of "From there it's no place for the meek", I believe that it is actually that. No misdirection. With the correct "there", which I believe is the home of Brown. With Brown, meek is self-evident, but yes, there is no risk to the searcher whatsoever! We need to understand no place for the meek, not actually experience anything risky at all. Forrest confirmed that.

Regarding "If you are brave and in the wood", there is some stickiness there in my view (I mis-typed trickiness, but now I prefer it that way). Many things are in the wood; how about rings (annular rings), or grain, for examples. I think it's something else...

If you're looking for ingenious trickiness, I would offer "The end is ever drawing nigh". I cannot say how, but I have never encountered it anywhere. But the exact pattern is confirmed elsewhere in the poem...

SYand42lbsHeavier,
Halogetter
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07-29-2019, 06:30 PM,
#4
RE: The Poem’s Word Tricks
(07-28-2019, 03:06 PM)Halogetter Wrote: This is me JB editing this post for clarity.

This piece was astree's remark.

"I think its reasonable to suspect that the poem uses words in a way that are tricky, and may misdirect, if not understood in the way intended."

then I deleted the remainder of Astree's post.

The remainder is Halogetter's. I hope I am not obfuscating.

Astree,

This next bit is Halogetter's words.

I agree with "tricky" (although I would use the word clever instead), but not misdirection. I don't believe there is misdirection employed as a device in the poem. There is almost limitless potential for taking the wrong direction or deviating from the correct one even with the correct beginning. But I believe Forrest is telling, not mis-telling.



SYand42lbsHeavier,
Halogetter

To my mind this is a semantic argument. Thousands of searches have taken place and presumably the box has not been recovered. I would argue that it is self-evident that the poem is rife with potential for misinterpretation. Whether that means there is misdirection or not depends pretty strongly on how one defines "misdirection." Clearly the likelihood of misinterpretation is high. In your words "there is almost limitless potential for taking the wrong direction or deviating from the correct one." If the difference between correct and incorrect interpretations is no more than a jot or tittle is that not in itself misdirection?
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07-29-2019, 07:09 PM,
#5
RE: The Poem’s Word Tricks
(07-29-2019, 06:30 PM)John Brown Wrote:
(07-28-2019, 03:06 PM)Halogetter Wrote: This is me JB editing this post for clarity.

This piece was astree's remark.

"I think its reasonable to suspect that the poem uses words in a way that are tricky, and may misdirect, if not understood in the way intended."

then I deleted the remainder of Astree's post.

The remainder is Halogetter's. I hope I am not obfuscating.

Astree,

This next bit is Halogetter's words.

I agree with "tricky" (although I would use the word clever instead), but not misdirection. I don't believe there is misdirection employed as a device in the poem. There is almost limitless potential for taking the wrong direction or deviating from the correct one even with the correct beginning. But I believe Forrest is telling, not mis-telling.



SYand42lbsHeavier,
Halogetter

To my mind this is a semantic argument. Thousands of searches have taken place and presumably the box has not been recovered. I would argue that it is self-evident that the poem is rife with potential for misinterpretation. Whether that means there is misdirection or not depends pretty strongly on how one defines "misdirection." Clearly the likelihood of misinterpretation is high. In your words "there is almost limitless potential for taking the wrong direction or deviating from the correct one." If the difference between correct and incorrect interpretations is no more than a jot or tittle is that not in itself misdirection?

i totally agree and i think it's pretty meaningless to try and frame it as either f was intending or not intending to mislead

it doesn't really make any difference, imo, to think about "intentions" in regard to being misled

it's very difficult to solve and being misled is going to be a result of that because there are so many incorrect ways to view what the poem is doing and only one correct way

what does matter is did f intend for it to be possible to determine the one and only correct solve. imo, the answer is yes and and he intended for it to be possible to know the location beforehand. and has tried to let us know that without being too direct about it. but he has been direct enough
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07-29-2019, 09:18 PM,
#6
The Poem’s Word Tricks
Forrest enjoys twisting words, corrupting thoughts and idioms, making up words, etc. It’s not that he’s being tricky, it’s just the method that he used to disguise the locations. I think he does it in regular conversation without even thinking about it. You just have to think the right thoughts.


razyfamily
Reply
07-29-2019, 10:30 PM,
#7
RE: The Poem’s Word Tricks
(07-28-2019, 12:54 PM)astree Wrote: .
I think its reasonable to suspect that the poem uses words in a way that are tricky, and may misdirect, if not understood in the way intended.

For example, the lines

“From there, its no place for the meek”

“If you are brave and in the wood”

seem to indicate perilous conditions, yet we ar3 told the chest is not in a dangerous place. (We could reason that there is reference or route interpretation that need not be taken in the retrieval).

Has anyone got other examples?

"Tarry scant with marvel gaze" has two distinct possible interpretations. I believe that he used the these words deliberately. One interpretation describes the blaze, the other just means, "hurry up" or whatever.
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07-30-2019, 09:23 AM,
#8
The Poem’s Word Tricks
(07-30-2019, 01:23 AM)Andrew Jef Wrote:
(07-29-2019, 10:30 PM)brubr Wrote:
(07-28-2019, 12:54 PM)astree Wrote: .
I think its reasonable to suspect that the poem uses words in a way that are tricky, and may misdirect, if not understood in the way intended.

For example, the lines

“From there, its no place for the meek”

“If you are brave and in the wood”

seem to indicate perilous conditions, yet we ar3 told the chest is not in a dangerous place. (We could reason that there is reference or route interpretation that need not be taken in the retrieval).

Has anyone got other examples?

"Tarry scant with marvel gaze" has two distinct possible interpretations. I believe that he used the these words deliberately. One interpretation describes the blaze, the other just means, "hurry up" or whatever.

I'm not going to address "tarry scant" right now. But when I think of
"marvel gaze", I remember a character in the 1939 movie "The Wizard of Oz" . . . I think his name was something similar to Professor Marvel. When he looked into his crystal ball, he told Dorothy that he saw people crying. I think the concept of tears could be significant in a correct solve of the poem.


And yet another distinct possible interpretation is a tarry slab of stone con buena vista.


razyfamily
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07-30-2019, 11:11 AM, (This post was last modified: 07-30-2019, 11:31 AM by J Smith.)
#9
RE: The Poem’s Word Tricks
Yes the poem tricks you or you get a treat i.e. box of gold.
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