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One thing nobody has thought about
02-16-2020, 12:24 PM, (This post was last modified: 02-16-2020, 12:35 PM by inthehunt.)
#1
One thing nobody has thought about
I believe he wrote the poem in a way that is fair for everyone.
Like more than one way to solve it.
What one thing nobody has thought about in my opinion is,
A good map= a globe
A few yards of twine= lines
Lines and globe= a ball of twine
Lines cross spot= blaze X
The big picture= see it?
Let's say look at the big picture, There are no shortcuts.
Could "Port Elizabeth" be the put in below the home of Brown?
I say yes.
Could no place for the meek be Hillsboro Oregon? I say yes.
I have actually made my ball of string and made a couple Lines cross.
I think I'm the first to give out this
Information.
In my picture I used some large string for demonstration only.
Small string is more precise.
Now I only wish I would have invested in globe stocks lol.[Image: 8b5ff2d790226516c2b5437231f976bd.jpg]

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First man was supposedly from Africa. Where we first started.
Perhaps someone will know the place for the first time.
Heavy loads and water high, reminds me of carrying pots of water on one's head.
There's a few things here that make me go hmmm.

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02-16-2020, 01:24 PM,
#2
RE: One thing nobody has thought about
Colonel Joseph Lafayette Meek is buried in Hillsboro, Oregon.

On one hand, he did a number of things that might lead Forrest to include him as a clue:

Meek was described as "the Davy Crockett of our Great Northwest, bold, adventurous, humorous, a first-class trapper, pioneer, peace officer, and frontier politician. More, he was the wittiest, saltiest, most shameless wag and jester that ever wore moccasins in the Rockies - a tall happy-go-lucky Virginian lover of practical jokes, tall tales, Jacksonian Democracy and Indian women."

On the other hand, he was a person who killed a lot of Native Americans during his life.

On balance, I don't think Forrest would use him as part of the clues. Just my opinion, of course. Many searchers have used him in solves over the years.
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02-16-2020, 01:34 PM,
#3
RE: One thing nobody has thought about
(02-16-2020, 01:24 PM)Beavertooth Wrote: Colonel Joseph Lafayette Meek is buried in Hillsboro, Oregon.

On one hand, he did a number of things that might lead Forrest to include him as a clue:

Meek was described as "the Davy Crockett of our Great Northwest, bold, adventurous, humorous, a first-class trapper, pioneer, peace officer, and frontier politician. More, he was the wittiest, saltiest, most shameless wag and jester that ever wore moccasins in the Rockies - a tall happy-go-lucky Virginian lover of practical jokes, tall tales, Jacksonian Democracy and Indian women."

On the other hand, he was a person who killed a lot of Native Americans during his life.

On balance, I don't think Forrest would use him as part of the clues. Just my opinion, of course. Many searchers have used him in solves over the years.
I know FF has great respect for the old mountain men.
I've considered both avenues.
The actual place Joe meek was standing at when "this is no place for us anymore" was horse creek and the green River not far from the mountain man museum .

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02-16-2020, 03:51 PM, (This post was last modified: 02-16-2020, 04:24 PM by inthehunt.)
#4
One thing nobody has thought about
I found a WWH in TTOTC
Ode to Peggy.
Look where he used the word "WARM" below that you'll see
"DAMPENED" below that,
"BEDRIDDEN"
The mucky trail that leads into the dark abyss.
Could be the starting point for the small scale boots on the ground.

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I tried to make a account on dal's site to share stuff with people over there and for some reason moderating would not allow me to post anything. It was like I was being scrutinized or something. So I came here instead. probably just a blessing anyway.

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02-16-2020, 05:14 PM, (This post was last modified: 02-16-2020, 05:35 PM by inthehunt.)
#5
One thing nobody has thought about
A WWH?
I'd say it's a possible clue that's been overlooked.
Where's a mucky/muddy trail leading into a Dark/black abyss?
I found one online I think.[Image: e4f50ecdb9960b0889e7c44a03682781.jpg]

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FF has talked about covered Bridges and red covered Bridges.
And about his father lighting candles at both ends.
This is connected to the chase I believe. And I think he may even rode these same tracks when he was young and doing summers in Yellowstone. I think it's all connected, and if you dig in a little bit you should definitely check out the Oliver mansion and it's history. But here is a link to the main page. All of it is interesting but please read down to the train wreck accident.

https://historymuseumsb.org/history-of-m...a-indiana/

And I'm going to post a couple pictures of the Oliver family and see if you can find a resemblance.
[Image: 35aecaa15905c5eb363afe5a010bf2a0.jpg][Image: 27d26c858a0478f3c4124965b75bb407.jpg]

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02-16-2020, 05:37 PM,
#6
RE: One thing nobody has thought about
(02-16-2020, 03:51 PM)inthehunt Wrote: I found a WWH in TTOTC
Ode to Peggy.
Look where he used the word "WARM" below that you'll see
"DAMPENED" below that,
"BEDRIDDEN"
The mucky trail that leads into the dark abyss.
Could be the starting point for the small scale boots on the ground.

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I tried to make a account on dal's site to share stuff with people over there and for some reason moderating would not allow me to post anything. It was like I was being scrutinized or something. So I came here instead. probably just a blessing anyway.

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Good catch on words re Peggy, now connect that to the poem. Hints in book help find solves.

(02-16-2020, 03:51 PM)inthehunt Wrote: I found a WWH in TTOTC
Ode to Peggy.
Look where he used the word "WARM" below that you'll see
"DAMPENED" below that,
"BEDRIDDEN"
The mucky trail that leads into the dark abyss.
Could be the starting point for the small scale boots on the ground.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

I tried to make a account on dal's site to share stuff with people over there and for some reason moderating would not allow me to post anything. It was like I was being scrutinized or something. So I came here instead. probably just a blessing anyway.

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Good catch on words re Peggy, now connect that to the poem. Hints in book help find solves.
Reply
02-16-2020, 06:18 PM, (This post was last modified: 02-16-2020, 06:41 PM by inthehunt.)
#7
One thing nobody has thought about
Phillip Fix Davis first picture.
JD Oliver second picture.
Do you see a resemblance? Look at the features even the ears.

Third picture is Nancy Elizabeth Davis.
Fourth picture is Doty Davis.

https://historymuseumsb.org/research-his...r-history/

I had been researching the southbend train wreck and Mishawaka and stumbled onto the Oliver family whom's Mansion is being held in trust by the museum. I think there is a connection to all of it with Forrest. And the train wreck. And the covered bridge that the attendant failed to light the candles inside "at both ends" for the on coming train. However fast the train was moving , the shore was still compromised by the rain.[Image: c70ce087cf886372a7bdf0054de81cc6.jpg][Image: 24559487faf414703fbea702e4d973a9.jpg][Image: 1c885cd857d49e5d7106ce4fd20a3b36.jpg][Image: 54d2aa1aee93d5f7ff546a19218214e5.jpg]

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Nancy Elizabeth Davis was clearly traveling somewhere in this photo, you can see her bags and things on the ground next to her.
Is to possible she was on that train at the time of the accident or Phillip was and they were meeting in South bend.? Her clothes look like possibly has blood or something staining her dress. The pictures from too far to walk, it's the very last page.[Image: e092b3aee84a58e1187906ca4902c3bb.jpg]

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The name ‘Mishawaka’ is an Indian-derived word that may mean “Big Rapids.”  However, there are small disagreements on the name of ‘Mishawaka.’  Some believe that Mishawaka was an Indian princess, the daughter of Shawnee Chief Elkhart.  Supposedly, Princess Mishawaka had a romance with a white fur trapper only known by the name of “Deadshot.”  However, Mishawaka’s Indian suitor, Greywolf, abducted her, with all this happening within the area now named after this famous Indian princess.

 

On January 21, 1835, Mishawaka became the first town to be incorporated, preceding by a few months the platting of the town of South Bend.

 

South of the newly named town of Mishawaka was a section several miles wide which was covered with water most of the year.  The marsh made roads into Mishawaka from the south impassable most of the year.  South of the marsh was a place called the Thick Woods.  Lumbermen and farmers inhabited this part of St. Joseph County.

 

Up until the 1830s people who wanted to cross the St. Joseph River used canoes, boats, or forded the river at Twin Branches or near the rapids.  Construction on a dam began in 1833 above the north and south races to increase the amount, and speed, of water that could be used for power.  Building of this dam wasn’t completed until 1837.

 

The first known bridge across the St. Joseph River was built in 1836.  Mr. Tuttle gave the land next to the St. Joseph Iron Works Company for a street to be built to the bridge.  The street was named Bridge Street for obvious reasons.  A Mr. DeCamp from Elkhart, Indiana was hired to build the bridge.  The lumber for the building of the bridge was floated downriver from Elkhart to the building site in Mishawaka.  The bridge was known as the “Bent Bridge” because it was higher in the middle than on the ends.

 

When the bridge first opened a toll was collected to cross the bridge.  Persons go to and from church were allowed to cross for free.  U.S. military troops, state militia, and military supplies could also cross the bridge for free.  However, the bridge eventually became toll-free.

 

The bridge stood for 9 years until ice destroyed the northern part of the bridge.  A covered bridge was built in 1848 to take its place.  After it was built it was painted bright red and was a spooky place at night.  To fight the darkness, Horace B. Fitch was paid $3.00 a month to line the inside the bridge with candles and to keep them lit throughout the night.

 

In the fall of 1839, George C. Merrifield opened a school in a building at the corner of Union and Fourth Street.  He had taught school before coming to Mishawaka in 1837.  On October 5, 1851, Mr. Merrifield dismissed all his students early to attend a town celebration welcoming the first passenger train to arrive in the small village.  The Michigan Southern and Northern Indiana Railroad train had chugged into Mishawaka for the very first time.  The steam train locomotive was named the John Striker and was about the size of a small farm tractor.  It burned wood for fuel, had to be stopped by using hand brakes, and had 3 passenger cars and a baggage car.  Thirty-five passengers were aboard the train.

 

The first freight train through Mishawaka was named “Goshen.”

 

There were many industrious craftsmen now settled in Mishawaka and many industries were established.  Mishawaka-manufactured items were being shipped by keel boat, wagon, and now the railroad.  These items went all over the United States and people were drawn to Mishawaka because of the fame of things made there.  This immigration to Mishawaka were led by many who came from Belgium and Italy.  They brought with them their families, their social cultures, their food, the religious beliefs, and a new cosmopolitan atmosphere to the town of Mishawaka.

The Terrible 1859 Railroad Disaster

A little before midnight on June 27, 1859 the Night Express train traveling from Chicago to Toledo roared into South Bend.  It had been a very rainy couple of days and when the Michigan Southern train carrying 150 people reached the Springbrook Bridge and the ravine it covered.  The soil holding up the railroad bridge was loosened to such an extend that when the train reached the ravine, the bridge gave way and the train and all its cars careened into the flooded abyss.

 

[https://historymuseumsb-org]The engine and its tender was literally buried into the muddy bank on the opposite side of the culvert.  The rest of the wooden cars were smashed into kindling and piled on top of each other.  The two first class passenger cars were torn to pieces and much of the cars were carried downstream, while the sleeping car, which was close to the rear of the train, was somewhat less damaged.

 

About 150 people were on the train; 60 were immediately taken from the wreck already deceased, and 50 or 60 more were wounded, or escaped unhurt.  Many were not found until days later and they all had drowned and their bodies were carried downstream.  Citizens of South Bend and Mishawaka were alerted to the accident by church bells being rung in the middle of the night and many groups of people showed up at the accident to help with the wounded.

 

A man who’s family had traveled on the doomed train recounted his experience:

 

The scene of the banks of the ravine [Mr. Pardee says] was truly awful, as one may well suppose, but he says the amount of human misery among the wounded was terrible to behold.  In the Mishawaka hotel he saw a fine little boy about 9 years old, with his left leg broken, and almost open through the thigh, while the right let is cut completely off.  The lad was failing fast and it is almost impossible for him to recover.

He was one of a family of five children, with the mother, who were going to meet the father and the husband of this family.  The mother was killed, a daughter is missing, and another boy is wounded not seriously.  He is in the same room with his wretched brother, while he saw another of the young ones, six years old, dead, having had his face completely cut off.   The bodies of the women were not much mutilated.

 

Another passenger, J.J.H. Rice, on the train recounted his experience:

 

He was in the sleeping car at the time of the accident, which occurred about midnight.  The first he knew of anything being the matter was when the water was rushing over the cars.  The lights were out, and nothing but an occasional flash of lightning was there to see by.  He jumped from the cars, but instead of landing on terra firma, he leaped into the torrent of water, but succeeded in making his way to a clump of bushes and got up the bank afterward.  He heard a great deal of screaming while in the current, and after landing the cries of distress were awful.  There being no lights, everything was in confusion, and survivors were rushing madly about the banks of the ravine in vain search of their missing friends and family.  He says one was killed in the sleeping car, but one old gentleman jumped out and was drowned in the current.  Mr. Rice says Osgood [the conductor] seemed crazy, he ran to South Bend and to Mishawaka, and then returned a distance of 8 miles, without his hat.  He took charge of him and brought him to the city [Davenport, Iowa] at 3:30 p.m. yesterday.

 

One woman who was on the train with her husband and five children, ran wildly about all night seeking her family, but without success, until morning, when she found them all dead.  She then went to a farm house a few yards off, where after sitting some minutes, the wretched wife and mother expired.

 

Mr. Rice says that a gentleman, with his wife and two children, were on the train on a pleasure trip to the East.  But in the accident the parties became separated.  The husband found one of his young ones dead in the morning; next he found his wife dead, but with her arms closely embracing the other child, who was saved.

 

The politically famous South Bend resident Schuyler Colfax sent a note to the Davenport Daily Gazette in Davenport, Iowa, on July 4, 1859 and explained that three more bodies had been found.

 

Hon. Schuyler Colfax informs us under date of Friday evening, in a note written in the cars, that two bodies were taken out of the ravine where the accident occurred, Thursday afternoon.  They were completely buried in the sand.  The first one was discovered by the toe of his foot being noticed.  One of these persons is named Campbell; the other is not known.

 

This morning the body of Miss Regan was found in the St. Joseph River, less than a mile below the fatal creek ravine.  She was identified by Mr. Whinery of South Bend (at whose house her mother died) by her dress.

 

Pieces of clothing have been found today by the workmen at the wreck, but up to 3:00 p.m., no more bodies [have been found].

 

Before the work of rebuilding the culvert is commenced, the people of Mishawaka have determined on excavating the ground, to see if more bodies cannot be found.  This course was determined upon a public meeting held in that place on Wednesday evening.

 

Today, the area close to the intersection of Ironwood and Lincoln Way East is where this accident happened.  The unclaimed bodies were eventually buried in Mishawaka’s City Cemetery.  Eventually all but a few of the victims of the disaster were claimed, the bodies not claimed still reside within Mishawaka City Cemetery in a mass grave.



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The entire poem could match the train wreck as sad as it is.
And the mucky trail into the black abyss.
:'(

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02-17-2020, 08:02 AM,
#8
RE: One thing nobody has thought about
@inthehunt
That is definitely a good dig; you hit on the proper lady. She represents the area you need to consider!!! You still need to dig a little bit more (just a few months) into her life... I almost crapped my pants when you put this information up. I thought I was the only one; how many others have this connection? Forrest has given a couple dozen hints around there but only two specifically (that I have found).
You are hot on the trail. Good luck...
just saying ss
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02-17-2020, 12:21 PM,
#9
One thing nobody has thought about
(02-16-2020, 05:14 PM)inthehunt Wrote: A WWH?
I'd say it's a possible clue that's been overlooked.
Where's a mucky/muddy trail leading into a Dark/black abyss?
I found one online I think.[Image: e4f50ecdb9960b0889e7c44a03682781.jpg]

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FF has talked about covered Bridges and red covered Bridges.
And about his father lighting candles at both ends.
This is connected to the chase I believe. And I think he may even rode these same tracks when he was young and doing summers in Yellowstone. I think it's all connected, and if you dig in a little bit you should definitely check out the Oliver mansion and it's history. But here is a link to the main page. All of it is interesting but please read down to the train wreck accident.

https://historymuseumsb.org/history-of-m...a-indiana/

And I'm going to post a couple pictures of the Oliver family and see if you can find a resemblance.
[Image: 35aecaa15905c5eb363afe5a010bf2a0.jpg][Image: 27d26c858a0478f3c4124965b75bb407.jpg]

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Nice find! Very helpful


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02-17-2020, 01:14 PM,
#10
RE: One thing nobody has thought about
(02-17-2020, 08:02 AM)easternOHsteve Wrote: @inthehunt
That is definitely a good dig; you hit on the proper lady. She represents the area you need to consider!!! You still need to dig a little bit more (just a few months) into her life... I almost crapped my pants when you put this information up. I thought I was the only one; how many others have this connection? Forrest has given a couple dozen hints around there but only two specifically (that I have found).
You are hot on the trail. Good luck...
I've actually been to the spot in December. I'm waiting for spring now. Everything was too frozen and under snow also. But I think I found it.

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