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The decryption
05-06-2020, 12:09 PM,
#31
RE: The decryption
It's always interesting to see how someone else decrypted the chase.

Thanks for posting.
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05-07-2020, 01:01 AM,
#32
RE: The decryption
“Go west. In a short hour you see a big lake, cross it, run south plus spider
west. From the videos you get the exact road you will try. Mirror this road. Aim south and look heading west for a grey ‘F’ sign.”
I’d love to see these videos...I’m not leaving my creek and I know every road around there. I’d be curious to see if he shot a video of my road....
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05-07-2020, 05:07 PM,
#33
RE: The decryption
The ‘vydeoz’ line within the directions is perhaps the most ambiguous one.

I believe it refers to two videos taken of Fenn, where he stands pointing at a carving on a tree. I think his intention was to use that carving to show the trail from which to ‘mirror’ the original path.

I don’t think the above line refers to a video of a scene somewhere in the countryside.
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05-08-2020, 02:36 AM,
#34
RE: The decryption
(05-07-2020, 05:07 PM)White Knight Wrote: The ‘vydeoz’ line within the directions is perhaps the most ambiguous one.

I believe it refers to two videos taken of Fenn, where he stands pointing at a carving on a tree. I think his intention was to use that carving to show the trail from which to ‘mirror’ the original path.

I don’t think the above line refers to a video of a scene somewhere in the countryside.

I’d love to see said video white knight. I’ve always wondered if this line In your solve could be a picture of Fenn on the right road somewhere in a picture in the background of one of his videos....
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05-09-2020, 02:45 AM,
#35
RE: The decryption
Fenn has shown an interest in Clovis culture and has made many references to Clovis culture and Clovis spear / arrowhead points in his output.

These references have included hints for the answer ‘Arrowhead for Giant Mammoth’ - the answer to the clue ‘your effort will be worth the cold’ (Clovis was an Ice Age culture):

Fenn sent pieces of a mammoth tusk to seasoned Searchers stating that (paraphrasing) he ‘didn’t find a Clovis point when he unearthed the tusk’. He suggested those remnants may ‘get Searchers thinking’. Fenn repeated a similar statement in Scrapbooks 117 & 117.5.

In Scrapbook 109, Fenn published a cartoon showing hunters killing a ‘giant mammoth’ with Clovis spear points.

In ‘questions with Jenny Kile’ Fenn said he would like to find ‘a Clovis point between the ribs of a mammoth’.
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05-09-2020, 03:14 PM,
#36
RE: The decryption
Regarding comment:

I’d love to see said video white knight. I’ve always wondered if this line In your solve could be a picture of Fenn on the right road somewhere in a picture in the background of one of his videos....


The videos weren't intended to show a location. It was Fenn gesturing to a tree carving, I think in his garden. Of the top of my head I seem to remember Fenn filmed them with a media company SBS (from Australia).

My interpretation of the 'videos' line in the decryption was that this carving showed the missing part of the directions.

The directions on page 1 of this thread seem to say: 'from the videos you get the exact road you'll try'. So the above videos looked like a reasonable candidate as Fenn gestured towards this carving for an extended period of time. But, as I said before some parts of the instructions are pretty vague.
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05-10-2020, 01:56 PM,
#37
RE: The decryption
It’s impossible to tell whether Fenn used the word ‘BYE’ or ‘FOE’ as the first part of his password on each line of the encryption shown on Page 1 of this thread.

I’ve included both words to show the difference to the result. The word on the inside track on each line is the one I think is most likely to be correct at that point. Most of the time it doesn’t seem to matter.

Fenn may have used the word ‘BYE’ all the way down on every line. In that case there would be a significant difference to the result, as a Searcher wouldn’t be required to cross the lake when following the remaining directions - the instruction to cross the lake wouldn’t apply.

In the above example there would be a large lump of nothing in that part of the encoding.

Originally, I thought it would be unlikely for Fenn to have used the word ‘antelope’ just for the availability of the last letter ‘e’.

But, it’s conceivable that he did this if he wanted to use only that letter ‘e’ together with the word ‘canyon’ to obtain the line of directions that says: ‘run S pluz’.

Fenn may have used the relatively long word ‘antelope’ simply to allow the whole answer ‘Antelope Canyon’ to fill the required gap, to match the length of his password phrase.
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05-10-2020, 03:29 PM,
#38
RE: The decryption
I would probably get criticised if I put up a link, but if you search on Google you should find it.

Here's the way it works using that example, the answer 'Antelope Canyon'. This is the answer to the clue 'no paddle up your creek but heavy loads and water high'.

Fenn has used answers that each can be converted to a line within a list of directions. 9 clues, 9 answers, because originally he had 9 lines of directions.

Look at the decryption on Page 1 of this thread. So using the right password (based around his name Fenn) the letters of those words convert to a list of directions leading to the treasure. You can see in the decryption that the 'e canyon' part of Antelope Canyon converts to make up most of the line: 'run S pluz'.

He used phonetics and text speak in a lot of lines as it's almost impossible to convert from perfect english to perfect english (if you don't believe me try it). Obviously the answer part of it had to be in perfect english for folk to get that side of it right.
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05-11-2020, 03:06 AM,
#39
RE: The decryption
Fenn stated in Scrapbook 62 (paraphrasing) that a ‘knowledge of ciphers, riddles or codes wouldn’t help a Searcher in finding the location of the treasure’. I believe this was deliberate mis-information as clearly Fenn used the Lewis & Clark cipher within the construct of a riddle - the book, poem, clues and hints each in themselves may be considered to be a riddle.

Fenn even stated elsewhere that his poem contained a ‘riddle’ - the nine clues (the riddle) had to be solved to find the treasure.

The following text is taken from a podcast with Fenn called ‘On the Road with Charlie’:

‘Well, it’s hidden in a pretty good place. It’s difficult to find, but it certainly isn’t impossible. But if you’re gonna find the treasure, you’re gonna have to solve the RIDDLE that’s in my poem. The nine clues that are in my poem. Nobody’s gonna happen on that treasure chest’.

So, this statement was in direct contradiction to the statement made within Scrapbook 62. i.e. Fenn’s statements evidently were unreliable.

In my view, Fenn tried to misdirect Searchers by stating ‘no ciphers or riddles’ to delay the finding of the correct solution and prolong the Chase.
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05-11-2020, 08:26 AM, (This post was last modified: 05-11-2020, 08:35 AM by Beavertooth.)
#40
RE: The decryption
(05-11-2020, 03:06 AM)White Knight Wrote: In my view, Fenn tried to misdirect Searchers by stating ‘no ciphers or riddles’ to delay the finding of the correct solution and prolong the Chase.

On the contrary, the statement was meant to help searchers understand how to solve the poem, and accelerate the Chase.

The use of the word "riddle" is a blatant aberration, or contradiction. It should be at the top of Becky from West Virginia's list of "aggravating aberrations" (my terminology). The poem is nothing but a riddle, or collection of riddles -- using the most common definition of the word "riddle". So what can you conclude from this contradiction? That you must look to uncommon definitions to change the meaning of, or "solve", the statement.

In this case, riddles could be considered sieves, which are used to sort, or place in order, or purify. The poem does not need to be "sorted", or placed in order, or purified. It already is.

Sieve methods are also used in mathematics ("sieve theory employs methods from mathematical analysis to solve number-theoretical problems" -- i.e., the Sieve of Eratosthenes used to find prime numbers), which is another way to view how "riddles" may be similar to codes and ciphers, without using the common definition of riddle.

I realize I have not answered your other point -- whether codes or ciphers need to be used to solve the poem. I leave that exercise to the searcher. Smile
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