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Le problème des labyrinthes
05-11-2020, 11:43 PM, (This post was last modified: 05-12-2020, 11:41 AM by thrilledtochase.)
#1
Le problème des labyrinthes
I don’t know if this is mentioned yet.
Fenn has told us many times that the poem contains nine clues. Looking up the origin of the word says it is a variant of clew, originally meaning a ball of thread to guide someone out of a labyrinth. But how to choose this particular variant? There is a confirmation from Fenn in his story about his large ball of thread he had built up in his own room. So how can this information be applied to the poem?

I believe it is giving us information to a very late stage in searching for the chest. Something to help everything line up by the time you find your way. The most famous mathematical proof on labyrinths was written by a mathematician by the name of Gaston Tarry. His proof shows that you can solve any labyrinth by a relatively simple if painstaking method. His proof reads

“ Let us suppose that on taking an alley for the first time you deposit at the entry two marks and the exit one or three marks, according as this alley emerges in a junction already visited or a new junction; and that on taking an alley where there is one mark at the entry, so that you are now following a second time and in the opposite direction, you are content to add a second mark to the entry. On arriving at a junction you will always be able to distinguish the new alleys which do not have any mark, the initial alley which has three marks, and the other alleys traversed only once and in the entry direction which have a single mark.

The one and only rule can then be stated in the following way:

On arriving at a junction, take as you please either an {190} alley which has no mark or an alley which has a single mark, and if neither of these exists take the alley which has three marks.

By following this practical rule, a traveller lost in a labyrinth or in the catacombs will inevitably find the entry before traversing all the alleys and without passing more than twice through the same alley”

There’s so much more to say. Someone out there knows the next few steps. I’d love to read about it in plain English and my biggest fear is people will come on here speaking in riddles to each other. What I’ve written above is fairly straight forward although I am omitting my next steps in converting it to more useful information. Would love to hear your thoughts to where everyone, codebreakers and non codebreakers alike will be able to understand it.
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05-12-2020, 12:23 AM, (This post was last modified: 05-12-2020, 12:26 AM by legacyhelper.)
#2
RE: Le problème des labyrinthes
(05-11-2020, 11:43 PM)thrilledtochase Wrote: I don’t know if this is mentioned yet.
Fenn has told us many times that the poem contains nine clues. Looking up the origin of the word says it is a variant of clew, originally meaning a ball of thread to guide someone out of a labyrinth. But how to choose this particular variant? There is a confirmation from Fenn in his story about his large ball of thread he had built up in his own room. So how can this information be applied to the poem?

I believe it is giving us information to a very late stage in searching for the chest. Something to help everything line up by the time you find your way. The most famous mathematical proof on labyrinths was written by a mathematician by the name of Gaston Terry. His proof shows that you can solve any labyrinth by a relatively simple if painstaking method. His proof reads

“ Let us suppose that on taking an alley for the first time you deposit at the entry two marks and the exit one or three marks, according as this alley emerges in a junction already visited or a new junction; and that on taking an alley where there is one mark at the entry, so that you are now following a second time and in the opposite direction, you are content to add a second mark to the entry. On arriving at a junction you will always be able to distinguish the new alleys which do not have any mark, the initial alley which has three marks, and the other alleys traversed only once and in the entry direction which have a single mark.

The one and only rule can then be stated in the following way:

On arriving at a junction, take as you please either an {190} alley which has no mark or an alley which has a single mark, and if neither of these exists take the alley which has three marks.

By following this practical rule, a traveller lost in a labyrinth or in the catacombs will inevitably find the entry before traversing all the alleys and without passing more than twice through the same alley”

There’s so much more to say. Someone out there knows the next few steps. I’d love to read about it in plain English and my biggest fear is people will come on here speaking in riddles to each other. What I’ve written above is fairly straight forward although I am omitting my next steps in converting it to more useful information. Would love to hear your thoughts to where everyone, codebreakers and non codebreakers alike will be able to understand it.

It's interesting, and perhaps not too surprising, that you used a bit of French. Sometimes I think about long-ago cave dwellers in the area
that is now called France. Several folks (in addition to old pilots) probably have an interest in archaeology, and may believe that about a hundred years ago, near the same river that "surrounds" the Notre Dame Cathedral, people used various tools to modify not only the ground (i.e., in gardening), but also in woodworking. While not highly
knowlegeable about Robert Louis Stevenson, I am somewhat aware of
the difference between a mattock and an adze.

I once saw a movie or TV program in which a guy playing poker was
lacking money or chips to bet with. So he put his revolver on the table as an item of value to bet with. I can imagine that in a similar betting game among workers that someone might bet using a different metal-and-wood item.

And it's some kind of coincidence -- and perhaps not a totally random one, one might suppose, that when I imagine modern-day France, and
its architecture, and think of betting woodworkers, I might imagine one who has an adze to risk. Whew!
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