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Q & A
09-16-2020, 08:40 AM,
#71
RE: Q & A
(09-16-2020, 01:12 AM)wildfuntear Wrote:
(09-14-2020, 03:12 PM)trigace Wrote: The shape of many of the images on the ground at the final search area are man made. Such as the ants ear (answer), a trophy (trove), the giant D's (sprinkled semicircular field), the crescent moon, the fen (pond), and the many giant letters (C, D, E, F, G, K, M, S, U, and W.) Other shapes and letters must be drawn per poem directions.

This area was developed into a sprinkled farm in 2006 (as seen on GE for that year.) Those man made images were made at that time. I think Forrest may have had a hand in this development, especially the pond/fen. It was made to fit the clues he would put in his poem. The location is at a huge double omega image. It's border is fenced. You must go through a "maze" of brush to get to the search area, so you will be amazed. He made two trips to hide the TC because there are two partially hidden ditches with vegetation that you almost always trip over going in.

The field isn't exactly circular, there are aberrations around the edges.

You must save your best smile until after you raise the lid because the smile line of the largest D of the field is partially camouflaged with vegetation. That area of vegetation looks like the lid of a toilet (the bell/coffee cup image) that is partially down. If it could be raised, the full smile of the 10th D would be exposed.

The one who finds the TC will be the one who can best adjust. Best adjust = best add right. The last clue directs you to add lines to the right.

When you draw the lines for the position of the sprinkler line at two different locations that are about 30 degrees apart, as directed by the poem, it forms the image of cone, that is also the image of a vaulted, or arched ceiling. This is next to the search area. Fenn said the finder should put the TC in a vault for 30 days and think about it. "It" is actually one of the lines forming the vault (Why is "it" that I must go...) So he's hinting at the TC location being next to the 30 degree image vault formed by "it."

Fenn also said the TC is not on top of a mountain but it is near the TOP. The cone is also the shape of a TOP (a spinning toy that Forrest carved as a boy), so the TC is near the sprinkler lines that form a TOP image when the lines are drawn. The TC is not near the top of a mountain.

The pond/fen/G also looks like a giant bear. It is next to the top of the sprinkled field. Fenn said to go a certain distance (I think Fenn used a mile, but it doesn't matter what the distance is) in a straight line then turn right 90 degrees and continue to go another mile but along an arc or curved line, then turn right 90 degrees again and go in a straight line back to where you began. Then he asked what color was the bear? Well, if you follow his directions, starting at the base of the sprinkler line and go about 1800 feet in a straight line to the end of the sprinkler pipe then turn 90 degrees and go along a curved line the same distance - the outer curve of the sprinkled field - then turn 90 degrees and go back to where you began, you will have passed the pond-shaped bear near the end of the curved line portion of the walk. He described the pond shape and the sprinkler field in one story. No one got it.

Like I've said, I could go on and on with how his stories and hints fit this search area. But no one will get it.

Please pardon my skepticism. If you're meaning that a man-made
sprinkler system will last thousands of years and help guide a searcher
to the trove, good luck . . . in solving the poem that way or getting
anyone to agree with you that this will help correctly solve the poem.

In my solve, all observable things (that is, "landmarks") that are indicated by the poem are natural and durable, and capable of lasting thousands of years in a substantially unchanged condition. I'm not relying on a D-shaped farm or the like.

Please show me the quote where Fenn said that all the clues must last 1,000 years or even 100 years. He said something like he didn't care if the TC wasn't found for 100 or 1,000 years. And that maybe MOST of the clues would last 100 or 1,000 years. But I never saw where he said that ALL the clues would last 100 or 1,000 years. Come on, give me the quote. He did say something like maybe someone would find it (accidentally) 1,000 years from now, but not by following the clues.
Reply
09-16-2020, 10:10 AM, (This post was last modified: 09-16-2020, 10:17 AM by NTMI.)
#72
RE: Q & A
(09-16-2020, 08:40 AM)trigace Wrote: [quote="wildfuntear" pid='241907' dateline='1600236721']
[quote="trigace" pid='241864' dateline='1600114324']


Please show me the quote where Fenn said that all the clues must last 1,000 years or even 100 years. He said something like he didn't care if the TC wasn't found for 100 or 1,000 years. And that maybe MOST of the clues would last 100 or 1,000 years. But I never saw where he said that ALL the clues would last 100 or 1,000 years. Come on, give me the quote. He did say something like maybe someone would find it (accidentally) 1,000 years from now, but not by following the clues.

"I'm not looking at this weekend or spring break. I'm looking at 100 years, maybe 1000 years from now. If somebody finds it tomorrow, that's fine, but they're not going to happen upon it. They're going to have to figure out the clues in the poem and it'll take them right straight to it." -f



"Funny thing about quotes. If you don't 'listen good', they may not be accurate" -NTMI

Did he say "years"? Or did he say "ears"? And how many searchers does it take to come up with 1100? Because that's the listed seating capacity of the opera house made of yellow stone...
Quote: "I don’t know, I feel halfway kind of glad, halfway kind of sad because the chase is over.” -f
Reply
09-16-2020, 10:42 AM,
#73
RE: Q & A
(09-16-2020, 10:10 AM)NTMI Wrote: Did he say "years"? Or did he say "ears"? And how many searchers does it take to come up with 1100? Because that's the listed seating capacity of the opera house made of yellow stone...

Are you referring to the opera house just north of Santa Fe? I don't know if it is made of yellow stone, but I thought it was just inside the 8.25 mile north of Santa Fe line (if memory serves me right -- I looked at that on the maps many years ago). It could have been just outside that line, but if so, would have made it an easy target for searchers at the time.
Reply
09-16-2020, 11:30 AM, (This post was last modified: 09-16-2020, 11:32 AM by NTMI.)
#74
RE: Q & A
(09-16-2020, 10:42 AM)Beavertooth Wrote:
(09-16-2020, 10:10 AM)NTMI Wrote: Did he say "years"? Or did he say "ears"? And how many searchers does it take to come up with 1100? Because that's the listed seating capacity of the opera house made of yellow stone...

Are you referring to the opera house just north of Santa Fe? I don't know if it is made of yellow stone, but I thought it was just inside the 8.25 mile north of Santa Fe line (if memory serves me right -- I looked at that on the maps many years ago). It could have been just outside that line, but if so, would have made it an easy target for searchers at the time.

No, Beavertooth, I only used the "more than 66,000 links north of Santa Fe" as a reference. My reasoning was that if I'm to be looking for something that is more than 8.25 miles north of Santa Fe, it would probably be the same type of something that is at that spot. When I discovered the Santa Fe Opera was at that location, I started looking at opera venues. There was one I found that is also on an azimuth of 270 degrees west of Toledo (OH, which coincidentally is the acronym for Opera House, and has been used to signify outhouse on some old maps) and is of yellow stone that was quarried from nearby and that's the one that caught my eye.
Once I made that discovery, I started referencing other clues, for instance:

More than 5000 ft. and less than 10200 ft? Denver, CO and Leadville, CO. The Tabor Grand Opera House and the Tabor Opera House. Two opera houses, one Horace (Tabor).

If you are brave and in the wood?
"Ben Wood, who arrived in Leadville in 1878, opened the first legitimate theater, Wood's Opera House, with a thousand seats. It was a first-class theater, where gentleman removed their hats and did not smoke or drink in the presence of a lady. Less than a year later, Wood opened the Windsor Hotel. His opera house was regarded as the largest and best theater constructed in the West, an honor it held until the opening of the Tabor Opera House."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leadville,_Colorado
Quote: "I don’t know, I feel halfway kind of glad, halfway kind of sad because the chase is over.” -f
Reply
09-16-2020, 11:50 AM,
#75
RE: Q & A
(09-16-2020, 11:30 AM)NTMI Wrote: No, Beavertooth, I only used the "more than 66,000 links north of Santa Fe" as a reference. My reasoning was that if I'm to be looking for something that is more than 8.25 miles north of Santa Fe, it would probably be the same type of something that is at that spot. When I discovered the Santa Fe Opera was at that location, I started looking at opera venues. There was one I found that is also on an azimuth of 270 degrees west of Toledo (OH, which coincidentally is the acronym for Opera House, and has been used to signify outhouse on some old maps) and is of yellow stone that was quarried from nearby and that's the one that caught my eye.
Once I made that discovery, I started referencing other clues, for instance:

More than 5000 ft. and less than 10200 ft? Denver, CO and Leadville, CO. The Tabor Grand Opera House and the Tabor Opera House. Two opera houses, one Horace (Tabor).

If you are brave and in the wood?
"Ben Wood, who arrived in Leadville in 1878, opened the first legitimate theater, Wood's Opera House, with a thousand seats. It was a first-class theater, where gentleman removed their hats and did not smoke or drink in the presence of a lady. Less than a year later, Wood opened the Windsor Hotel. His opera house was regarded as the largest and best theater constructed in the West, an honor it held until the opening of the Tabor Opera House."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leadville,_Colorado

Interesting. This just shows how a searcher (me, in this instance) might be pointed directly at a clue, and completely miss the connections going forward. Your "Wood" sounds better (pun intended) than my use of Lt. Wood as the interpreter for Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce, or my early solve use of "wood glass" for ultraviolet lamps -- resulting in a lot of searching at night -- I should have been singing arias to scare off the bears! Smile
Reply
09-16-2020, 12:08 PM, (This post was last modified: 09-16-2020, 12:31 PM by NTMI.)
#76
RE: Q & A
(09-16-2020, 11:50 AM)Beavertooth Wrote:
(09-16-2020, 11:30 AM)NTMI Wrote: No, Beavertooth, I only used the "more than 66,000 links north of Santa Fe" as a reference. My reasoning was that if I'm to be looking for something that is more than 8.25 miles north of Santa Fe, it would probably be the same type of something that is at that spot. When I discovered the Santa Fe Opera was at that location, I started looking at opera venues. There was one I found that is also on an azimuth of 270 degrees west of Toledo (OH, which coincidentally is the acronym for Opera House, and has been used to signify outhouse on some old maps) and is of yellow stone that was quarried from nearby and that's the one that caught my eye.
Once I made that discovery, I started referencing other clues, for instance:

More than 5000 ft. and less than 10200 ft? Denver, CO and Leadville, CO. The Tabor Grand Opera House and the Tabor Opera House. Two opera houses, one Horace (Tabor).

If you are brave and in the wood?
"Ben Wood, who arrived in Leadville in 1878, opened the first legitimate theater, Wood's Opera House, with a thousand seats. It was a first-class theater, where gentleman removed their hats and did not smoke or drink in the presence of a lady. Less than a year later, Wood opened the Windsor Hotel. His opera house was regarded as the largest and best theater constructed in the West, an honor it held until the opening of the Tabor Opera House."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leadville,_Colorado

Interesting. This just shows how a searcher (me, in this instance) might be pointed directly at a clue, and completely miss the connections going forward. Your "Wood" sounds better (pun intended) than my use of Lt. Wood as the interpreter for Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce, or my early solve use of "wood glass" for ultraviolet lamps -- resulting in a lot of searching at night -- I should have been singing arias to scare off the bears! Smile
LOL!
Fenn always appeared to be a trickster, a smoke and mirrors kind of guy. For instance, my war for ME - "M" "E" - Emmy, the opera singing character Christine Daae in Andrew Lloyd Webber's Phantom of the Opera who sang Think of Me. How many other hints can you see in the clip?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XfTgCPUJwRk

Eric Sloane - Eric's Alone, which was the ultimate disposition of the Teacher with a Rope after Christine ran off with Raoul, the Viscount. John Charles Whatever - Jean Charles Garnier, the architect of the Paris Opera House (Palais Garnier).

You know, the same stuff trigace is referencing, only different.

By the way, had he ever asked me for nude photos, I would have told him to just go browse on MetArt - which is not associated with any structure that has the word MET in it. And since he said he never met the finder, I will confirm that he never told me to meet him at the MET. Although, that may be why he said Peggy would be somewhere, waiting for him.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Fenn
Quote: "I don’t know, I feel halfway kind of glad, halfway kind of sad because the chase is over.” -f
Reply
09-16-2020, 02:33 PM, (This post was last modified: 09-16-2020, 02:35 PM by Beavertooth.)
#77
RE: Q & A
(09-16-2020, 12:08 PM)NTMI Wrote: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Fenn

From Jean Fenn's bio at Wikipedia:

"She later received vocal coaching from Sigmund Romberg"

Romberg wrote "Stout-hearted Men" as a song for his operetta, The New Moon.

Stout = brave
hearted = in the wood (ie, heartwood)

I used the moon in my later solves. (Kepler Crater, Kepler's Dream (first scifi story, including a trip to the moon), and Kepler Cascades, mirror, blaze, Tycho Crater, Archimedes crater, etc). Look "quickly" down = the quick of the fingernail or toenail = lunula = small moon.
Reply
09-16-2020, 02:53 PM, (This post was last modified: 09-16-2020, 03:14 PM by NTMI.)
#78
RE: Q & A
(09-16-2020, 02:33 PM)Beavertooth Wrote:
(09-16-2020, 12:08 PM)NTMI Wrote: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Fenn

From Jean Fenn's bio at Wikipedia:

"She later received vocal coaching from Sigmund Romberg"

Romberg wrote "Stout-hearted Men" as a song for his operetta, The New Moon.

Stout = brave
hearted = in the wood (ie, heartwood)

I used the moon in my later solves. (Kepler Crater, Kepler's Dream (first scifi story, including a trip to the moon), and Kepler Cascades, mirror, blaze, Tycho Crater, Archimedes crater, etc). Look "quickly" down = the quick of the fingernail or toenail = lunula = small moon.
It's really easy to make operatic connections. The 'elephants' and 'ants' reference may have its roots in the Triumphal March of Aida, an opera by Verdi - in which some production companies actually paraded elephants across the stage!
Quote: "I don’t know, I feel halfway kind of glad, halfway kind of sad because the chase is over.” -f
Reply
09-16-2020, 06:53 PM,
#79
RE: Q & A
(09-16-2020, 10:10 AM)NTMI Wrote:
(09-16-2020, 08:40 AM)trigace Wrote: [quote="wildfuntear" pid='241907' dateline='1600236721']
[quote="trigace" pid='241864' dateline='1600114324']


Please show me the quote where Fenn said that all the clues must last 1,000 years or even 100 years. He said something like he didn't care if the TC wasn't found for 100 or 1,000 years. And that maybe MOST of the clues would last 100 or 1,000 years. But I never saw where he said that ALL the clues would last 100 or 1,000 years. Come on, give me the quote. He did say something like maybe someone would find it (accidentally) 1,000 years from now, but not by following the clues.

"I'm not looking at this weekend or spring break. I'm looking at 100 years, maybe 1000 years from now. If somebody finds it tomorrow, that's fine, but they're not going to happen upon it. They're going to have to figure out the clues in the poem and it'll take them right straight to it." -f



"Funny thing about quotes. If you don't 'listen good', they may not be accurate" -NTMI

Did he say "years"? Or did he say "ears"? And how many searchers does it take to come up with 1100? Because that's the listed seating capacity of the opera house made of yellow stone...

Your quote of Fenn said, "I'm looking at 100 years, maybe 1,000 years from now."

What does that mean? Most think it means there must still exist all the clues in 100 or 1,000 years. But he didn't say that. He was just "looking" at those times. He said if someone finds it tomorrow....they're going to have to figure out the clues in poem. He didn't say they even had to use the poem to find it in 100/1,000 years. Someone could dig it up in a 1,000 years and not "stumble" onto it.

Listen good to this funny quote:

Q: "Did the same 9 clues exist when you were a kid and to your estimation will they still exist in 100 years and 1,000 years?"

F: "The clues did not exist when I was a kid but MOST of the places the clues refer to did. I think they MIGHT still exist in 100 years but the geography probably will change before we reach the next millenia."

Look at the "I think" and "might". He's only speculating. And it's about the "places" that the clues refer to, not the "things" that might exist near the TC, like a sprinkler line.

Also, Fenn didn't outright give the sprinkler line as a clue....just a hint, sprinkled in his book. It would be possible to solve the clues without even using the sprinkler line.

Fennn always said he liked to play with words, phrases, and definitions. We've been played.
Reply
09-17-2020, 12:13 AM,
#80
RE: Q & A
(09-16-2020, 06:53 PM)trigace Wrote:
(09-16-2020, 10:10 AM)NTMI Wrote:
(09-16-2020, 08:40 AM)trigace Wrote: [quote="wildfuntear" pid='241907' dateline='1600236721']
[quote="trigace" pid='241864' dateline='1600114324']


Please show me the quote where Fenn said that all the clues must last 1,000 years or even 100 years. He said something like he didn't care if the TC wasn't found for 100 or 1,000 years. And that maybe MOST of the clues would last 100 or 1,000 years. But I never saw where he said that ALL the clues would last 100 or 1,000 years. Come on, give me the quote. He did say something like maybe someone would find it (accidentally) 1,000 years from now, but not by following the clues.

"I'm not looking at this weekend or spring break. I'm looking at 100 years, maybe 1000 years from now. If somebody finds it tomorrow, that's fine, but they're not going to happen upon it. They're going to have to figure out the clues in the poem and it'll take them right straight to it." -f



"Funny thing about quotes. If you don't 'listen good', they may not be accurate" -NTMI

Did he say "years"? Or did he say "ears"? And how many searchers does it take to come up with 1100? Because that's the listed seating capacity of the opera house made of yellow stone...

Your quote of Fenn said, "I'm looking at 100 years, maybe 1,000 years from now."

What does that mean? Most think it means there must still exist all the clues in 100 or 1,000 years. But he didn't say that. He was just "looking" at those times. He said if someone finds it tomorrow....they're going to have to figure out the clues in poem. He didn't say they even had to use the poem to find it in 100/1,000 years. Someone could dig it up in a 1,000 years and not "stumble" onto it.

Listen good to this funny quote:

Q: "Did the same 9 clues exist when you were a kid and to your estimation will they still exist in 100 years and 1,000 years?"

F: "The clues did not exist when I was a kid but MOST of the places the clues refer to did. I think they MIGHT still exist in 100 years but the geography probably will change before we reach the next millenia."

Look at the "I think" and "might". He's only speculating. And it's about the "places" that the clues refer to, not the "things" that might exist near the TC, like a sprinkler line.

Also, Fenn didn't outright give the sprinkler line as a clue....just a hint, sprinkled in his book. It would be possible to solve the clues without even using the sprinkler line.

Fennn always said he liked to play with words, phrases, and definitions. We've been played.

Too much noise in that answer to nail down a solid hint, but probably intentional on his part. We're left with what age he considered himself to be a kid. The geography has a high chance of changing in my area, you should see how much it's changed in the last decade!

Still though, I will not try to convince you that you're wrong - especially if you sincerely believe that we've been played.

If anyone's actually paying attention to what's going on in this thread, I won't be posting over the next two weekends. Some fellow searchers know why not, but it's not really important enough to post on here.
Quote: "I don’t know, I feel halfway kind of glad, halfway kind of sad because the chase is over.” -f
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