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Astronomy Parts of a Solve
09-09-2020, 12:51 AM,
#1
Astronomy Parts of a Solve
From my earlier posts, my WWWH was the weir at the top of Kepler Cascades in Yellowstone National Park.

Assuming there are multiple layers for the poem, the WWWH layer pinpointing where to begin is most likely Kepler cascades. I previously pointed out that almost every line of the poem can be associated with a discovery or invention made by Kepler. The Kepler Crater on the moon is also visible every night as a "blaze" in the night sky (as is the Milky Way).

From my teaser the other day, here is the answer to why the Chaos and Embroidery dolls relate to the astronomy portion of a solve: they represent the Cowherd and the Weaver Girl Chinese folk tale about the Summer Triangle (Navigator's Triangle). One side of the triangle represents the magpie bridge across the Milky Way (a blaze) that they are allowed to cross once a year. They are "not allowed to cross it" the rest of the year. Magpies are referenced in TTOTC and are the only bird that can recognize themselves in a mirror. Add to that all the references to pies and pi in TTOTC.

Within the Navigator's Triangle is the Northern Cross (part of the Cygnus, or Swan, constellation). The center of the Cross is a star called Sadr, which means the breast, or "chest" of the swan. The Cygnus constellation looks a lot like the peace symbol. So you can have "take the chest and go in peace" mean something without it being the end of the puzzle solve.

One of the final Scrapbooks concluded with an artwork of White Swan, a Crow scout who was at the Battle of the Little Bighorn and who became deaf due to a blow to the head from a club (hammer) incurred during the battle. I think Forrest was trying to reemphasize the Swan constellation with this scrapbook.

Deafness was important to Forrest (due to his hearing problems), and his many clues about hammers may refer to the tiny hammer bone within our ears. Thor was associated with a hammer, and in the picture of Peggy at the seashore she is holding a hammerhead (bonnethead) shark. Forrest also wrote about the hammer that he says was under the Sharp cabin. Even the most famous fairy -- Tinkerbell -- used a hammer in her trade as a tinker. There may be a different reason Forrest emphasized hammers, but I went with this one (i.e., referring to White Swan, and therefore the Northern Cross).

If you overlay a Navigator's Triangle and a Northern Cross within it on top of a map of Yellowstone, it allows you to leap across from the Kepler Cascade/Old Faithful/main geyser areas of Yellowstone to the other side of the Park where the Yellowstone River, falls, and Fishing bridge are located. You may need to use a mirror image, however, and/or an upside down image -- as discovered by Kepler for the optics of the eye, and for keyhole cameras and camera obscuras, that he also discovered.

In doing so, please remember Tinkerbell's advice on how to find Neverland: "Second star to the right, and straight on 'til morning."

To keep things simple, I have left out other parts of an astronomy-based layer, including the binary star "Anser" ("the answers I already know") which is a goose in the jaws of the fox constellation Vulpecula. Because Anser is a binary star (two stars that look like one), the original typo contradiction in the poem (answer vs. answers) did not matter, as Fenn stated.

As a further teaser, however, WWWH in the astronomy layer is the black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Why? The Teapot asterism within the Sagittarius constellation can be viewed as having a steam cloud of misty stars exiting the spout and passing very near the black hole at the center of the galaxy ("in the middle"). "To complete the teapot metaphor, under good conditions, a particularly dense area of the Milky Way can be seen rising in a north-westerly arc above the spout, like a puff of steam rising from a boiling kettle." -- Wikipedia -- Note that much of this steamy area is also known as Baade's Window -- which may or may not relate to windows breaking in TTOTC.

Interestingly, the tip of the spout in the teapot is a star previously called Alnasi, or "the arrowhead". Sagittarius is the "Archer" constellation.

For Fenn stick figure aficionados in the crowd, the constellations are essentially stick figure drawings in the sky, which Fenn would have been very familiar with on dark summer nights growing up in Yellowstone.
Reply
09-09-2020, 06:08 AM,
#2
RE: Astronomy Parts of a Solve
I love how many solves were researched and tied to subjects nobody else noticed . I researched how there are no new stories. All our history was passed down through oral history, word of mouth before there was a written language. If you look at all the legends were the same when you looked at the basics in the stories and they were all tied to the stars. It didn’t matter where in the world you were , the stories were the same. Different names for the exact same idea. I loved reading about all those legends and how they tied to the position of stars and even the words themselves were based on the stars.

Forrest was the best teacher I ever had. He taught me about how I could teach myself to learn about any subject. He encouraged us all to be the best that we could be. That is his legacy .
It is out there, somewhere .
Reply
09-09-2020, 08:10 AM,
#3
RE: Astronomy Parts of a Solve
(09-09-2020, 06:08 AM)azuredeb Wrote: I love how many solves were researched and tied to subjects nobody else noticed . I researched how there are no new stories. All our history was passed down through oral history, word of mouth before there was a written language. If you look at all the legends were the same when you looked at the basics in the stories and they were all tied to the stars. It didn’t matter where in the world you were , the stories were the same. Different names for the exact same idea. I loved reading about all those legends and how they tied to the position of stars and even the words themselves were based on the stars.

Forrest was the best teacher I ever had. He taught me about how I could teach myself to learn about any subject. He encouraged us all to be the best that we could be. That is his legacy .

Very well said. Ditto.

He's probably looking down right now with a big smile on his face -- you called him "the best teacher I ever had." That's the best eulogy he could have ever wanted.
Reply
09-09-2020, 08:52 PM,
#4
RE: Astronomy Parts of a Solve
(09-09-2020, 12:51 AM)Beavertooth Wrote: From my earlier posts, my WWWH was the weir at the top of Kepler Cascades in Yellowstone National Park.

Assuming there are multiple layers for the poem, the WWWH layer pinpointing where to begin is most likely Kepler cascades. I previously pointed out that almost every line of the poem can be associated with a discovery or invention made by Kepler. The Kepler Crater on the moon is also visible every night as a "blaze" in the night sky (as is the Milky Way).

From my teaser the other day, here is the answer to why the Chaos and Embroidery dolls relate to the astronomy portion of a solve: they represent the Cowherd and the Weaver Girl Chinese folk tale about the Summer Triangle (Navigator's Triangle). One side of the triangle represents the magpie bridge across the Milky Way (a blaze) that they are allowed to cross once a year. They are "not allowed to cross it" the rest of the year. Magpies are referenced in TTOTC and are the only bird that can recognize themselves in a mirror. Add to that all the references to pies and pi in TTOTC.

Within the Navigator's Triangle is the Northern Cross (part of the Cygnus, or Swan, constellation). The center of the Cross is a star called Sadr, which means the breast, or "chest" of the swan. The Cygnus constellation looks a lot like the peace symbol. So you can have "take the chest and go in peace" mean something without it being the end of the puzzle solve.

One of the final Scrapbooks concluded with an artwork of White Swan, a Crow scout who was at the Battle of the Little Bighorn and who became deaf due to a blow to the head from a club (hammer) incurred during the battle. I think Forrest was trying to reemphasize the Swan constellation with this scrapbook.

Deafness was important to Forrest (due to his hearing problems), and his many clues about hammers may refer to the tiny hammer bone within our ears. Thor was associated with a hammer, and in the picture of Peggy at the seashore she is holding a hammerhead (bonnethead) shark. Forrest also wrote about the hammer that he says was under the Sharp cabin. Even the most famous fairy -- Tinkerbell -- used a hammer in her trade as a tinker. There may be a different reason Forrest emphasized hammers, but I went with this one (i.e., referring to White Swan, and therefore the Northern Cross).

If you overlay a Navigator's Triangle and a Northern Cross within it on top of a map of Yellowstone, it allows you to leap across from the Kepler Cascade/Old Faithful/main geyser areas of Yellowstone to the other side of the Park where the Yellowstone River, falls, and Fishing bridge are located. You may need to use a mirror image, however, and/or an upside down image -- as discovered by Kepler for the optics of the eye, and for keyhole cameras and camera obscuras, that he also discovered.

In doing so, please remember Tinkerbell's advice on how to find Neverland: "Second star to the right, and straight on 'til morning."

To keep things simple, I have left out other parts of an astronomy-based layer, including the binary star "Anser" ("the answers I already know") which is a goose in the jaws of the fox constellation Vulpecula. Because Anser is a binary star (two stars that look like one), the original typo contradiction in the poem (answer vs. answers) did not matter, as Fenn stated.

As a further teaser, however, WWWH in the astronomy layer is the black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. Why? The Teapot asterism within the Sagittarius constellation can be viewed as having a steam cloud of misty stars exiting the spout and passing very near the black hole at the center of the galaxy ("in the middle"). "To complete the teapot metaphor, under good conditions, a particularly dense area of the Milky Way can be seen rising in a north-westerly arc above the spout, like a puff of steam rising from a boiling kettle." -- Wikipedia -- Note that much of this steamy area is also known as Baade's Window -- which may or may not relate to windows breaking in TTOTC.

Interestingly, the tip of the spout in the teapot is a star previously called Alnasi, or "the arrowhead". Sagittarius is the "Archer" constellation.

For Fenn stick figure aficionados in the crowd, the constellations are essentially stick figure drawings in the sky, which Fenn would have been very familiar with on dark summer nights growing up in Yellowstone.

You've said something that tends to make me think you know more about the correct solve (or at least part of it), compared to how much a
statistically average searcher knows about this. But I'm afraid to mention what that thing is. Good luck in all of this, and thank you for
posting.
Reply


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