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I haven't given up
12-04-2015, 09:08 AM,
#1
I haven't given up
I've just become more aware of and comfortable with what I don't know about the clues. In the beginning it seemed that I had to find the answers, that they had to be there somewhere. My confidence that the chase was solvable was based on believing instead of facts. I still wonder how imagination fits in?
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12-04-2015, 12:34 PM,
#2
RE: I haven't given up
(12-04-2015, 09:08 AM)James Perotti Wrote: I've just become more aware of and comfortable with what I don't know about the clues. In the beginning it seemed that I had to find the answers, that they had to be there somewhere. My confidence that the chase was solvable was based on believing instead of facts. I still wonder how imagination fits in?

The facts in this search are known only by Forrest himself. Everything else is just a guess, and guesses require imagination. No amount of imagination will create a fact out of thin air, but we can come close. Pretend you are Sherlock Holmes.

The 'facts' in my solution did not spring from a single source. In other words, each fact---each solved clue---was made of several pieces that came together over time. I found parts in TTOTC, some came from things Forrest said in interviews, others came from maps or postings from other searchers. The imagination part was putting all these smaller pieces together and concluding, Aha! so that's what the home of Brown is! It's the Sherlock Holmes moment when all the clues from the crime scene are woven together and become a usable piece of evidence.

Is this the process of imagination you're looking for? Personally, I think it's more valuable than looking for the one magic clue that stands alone and pristine in some cipher. I think it's the same process Forrest used when he created the poem---a little bit of art, a little bit of mystery, some humor, some misdirection.
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12-04-2015, 07:31 PM,
#3
RE: I haven't given up
Hi Larsonist, Mr. Fenn said there was one possibility that no one had thought of yet, that might be where imagination comes in? I was thinking that hints and clues might not be what we need to be looking for, but that there might be some other means of understanding what it is?
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12-04-2015, 08:35 PM,
#4
RE: I haven't given up
(12-04-2015, 07:31 PM)James Perotti Wrote: Hi Larsonist, Mr. Fenn said there was one possibility that no one had thought of yet, that might be where imagination comes in? I was thinking that hints and clues might not be what we need to be looking for, but that there might be some other means of understanding what it is?

This possibility has to be in the poem; there just isn't anything else of equal importance. He keeps telling us to look at the poem, so we have to do that. I know it seems like beating a dead horse but Forrest says look to the poem.

Here is one thing I've tried. I look up all the weird words in the poem, all the ones that just don't seem to belong or make sense. Then I try to insert their synonyms into the poem to see if the poem makes more sense. This is kind of a long repetitive process, but I think I make more progress this way than looking in scrap books for instance. It's a very poem-centric approach.

Do this for every word you think is weird, then re-write the poem using the synonyms and see if it starts to make more sense. This may not gel all at once but maybe in a few days fuzzy parts of the poem may start to make more sense. The poem is a piece of granite and you have to chisel away everything that doesn't belong there. Chisel away all the stuff that isn't treasure chest.
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12-04-2015, 08:47 PM,
#5
RE: I haven't given up
(12-04-2015, 08:35 PM)Larsonist Wrote:
(12-04-2015, 07:31 PM)James Perotti Wrote: Hi Larsonist, Mr. Fenn said there was one possibility that no one had thought of yet, that might be where imagination comes in? I was thinking that hints and clues might not be what we need to be looking for, but that there might be some other means of understanding what it is?

This possibility has to be in the poem; there just isn't anything else of equal importance. He keeps telling us to look at the poem, so we have to do that. I know it seems like beating a dead horse but Forrest says look to the poem.

Here is one thing I've tried. I look up all the weird words in the poem, all the ones that just don't seem to belong or make sense. Then I try to insert their synonyms into the poem to see if the poem makes more sense. This is kind of a long repetitive process, but I think I make more progress this way than looking in scrap books for instance. It's a very poem-centric approach.

Do this for every word you think is weird, then re-write the poem using the synonyms and see if it starts to make more sense. This may not gel all at once but maybe in a few days fuzzy parts of the poem may start to make more sense. The poem is a piece of granite and you have to chisel away everything that doesn't belong there. Chisel away all the stuff that isn't treasure chest.

That was one of the first things I ever did.

Word Origin & History
thesaurus 1823, "treasury, storehouse," from L. thesaurus "treasury, treasure," from Gk. thesauros "a treasure, treasury, storehouse, chest," from root of tithenai "to put, to place." The meaning "encyclopedia filled with information" is from 1840, but existed earlier as thesaurarie (1592), used as a title by early dictionary compilers. Meaning "collection of words arranged according to sense" is first attested 1852 in Roget's title. Thesaur is attested in M.E. with the meaning "treasure" (15c.-16c.).

*******************************************************************
"But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be the shepherd." - Jules Winnfield
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12-04-2015, 09:01 PM,
#6
RE: I haven't given up
(12-04-2015, 08:47 PM)Project Why Wrote: That was one of the first things I ever did.
Word Origin & History
thesaurus 1823, "treasury, storehouse," from L. thesaurus "treasury, treasure," from Gk. thesauros "a treasure, treasury, storehouse, chest," from root of tithenai "to put, to place." The meaning "encyclopedia filled with information" is from 1840, but existed earlier as thesaurarie (1592), used as a title by early dictionary compilers. Meaning "collection of words arranged according to sense" is first attested 1852 in Roget's title. Thesaur is attested in M.E. with the meaning "treasure" (15c.-16c.).

And did this help?

I think one of the effects of this approach is its power to make you start thinking like Forrest. He picks some outdated meaning and uses it instead of a modern definition. He has a whimsical nature and writes sensible words in an unsensible manner. We have to make sense of Jabberwocky.
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12-04-2015, 09:25 PM,
#7
RE: I haven't given up
(12-04-2015, 09:01 PM)Larsonist Wrote:
(12-04-2015, 08:47 PM)Project Why Wrote: That was one of the first things I ever did.
Word Origin & History
thesaurus 1823, "treasury, storehouse," from L. thesaurus "treasury, treasure," from Gk. thesauros "a treasure, treasury, storehouse, chest," from root of tithenai "to put, to place." The meaning "encyclopedia filled with information" is from 1840, but existed earlier as thesaurarie (1592), used as a title by early dictionary compilers. Meaning "collection of words arranged according to sense" is first attested 1852 in Roget's title. Thesaur is attested in M.E. with the meaning "treasure" (15c.-16c.).

And did this help?

I think one of the effects of this approach is its power to make you start thinking like Forrest. He picks some outdated meaning and uses it instead of a modern definition. He has a whimsical nature and writes sensible words in an unsensible manner. We have to make sense of Jabberwocky.
Only time will ever tell.

I've incorporated many theories in many places, but this has always been a good well to draw water from. A good foundation. Words only have meaning if one understands them. And having a better picture of what word meanings, history, and having a "collection of words arranged according to sense", a "storehouse", .....I can't see how it couldn't be anything but beneficial. What is the "sense" Forrest Fenn has though? This "vocabulary"? What was he thinking of, .....when he said what he said and used what words he used? That's what we are trying to understand, figure out. He said not to "mess" with his poem!! But we must understand it in order to figure it out and read it the right way. He knows that. We don't "change" it, we just view it from different angles and then apply it in the field. IMO

*******************************************************************
"But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be the shepherd." - Jules Winnfield
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