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clueless about clues
09-03-2013, 01:29 PM,
#21
clueless about clues
thrillchaser,

why do you believe HOB is not a clue?



and would you share your Method?, obviously, with out revealing any of your conclusions.
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09-03-2013, 01:34 PM,
#22
clueless about clues
I know of other authors who have hidden treasures and left clues for them, and I have participated. As far as I know, Forrest has never done it before, and it is rare for this type of hunt.



The main point is that the person creating the clues has no precise way of knowing just how difficult they have made your challenge, or how long it will take. The probabilities are unknown. Forrest cannot know for sure.



SYand42lbsHeavier

Halogetter

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09-03-2013, 01:47 PM,
#23
clueless about clues


<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from Seeker on September 3, 2013, 2:29 pm</b>

thrillchaser,

why do you believe HOB is not a clue?



and would you share your Method?, obviously, with out revealing any of your conclusions.
</div>


I believe it is not a clue one of the nine clues in the poem that lead to the end of his rainbow and the treasure, because I have identified nine clues and that is not one of them.



I choose to not share my method, but it is very simple to explain - perhaps in a single sentence.



Instead, I would ask you or anyone else inquiring, "What are the nine clues?"



That's the first step. For all practical purposes, there is no hope for you finding the literal treasure if you can't answer that question.

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09-03-2013, 01:54 PM,
#24
clueless about clues


<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from pidmt on September 3, 2013, 12:37 pm</b>

mdavis 19 I think it was you and I who had tax conversations before,but what about to the place to sell it?
</div>


Are you asking how I would sell the treasure if I find it? I think the way to get the most money out of the treasure is to get as much media exposure as possible after finding the treasure. Then quickly, before the media hype dies down, consign it all as a lot it to an auction house like Sotheby's or Christie's with a reserve of three quarters to one million dollars. If there are no takers for the lot, I'd start piecing it out. The coins and nuggets will be easy enough to sell. There is a ready market for them. The other items will probably need to go to auction individually with little or no reserve and hope for the best. The piece out strategy probably won't bring much more than $500,000-$600,000 in my estimation.



mdavis19
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09-03-2013, 03:39 PM,
#25
clueless about clues
people that say HOB isn't a clue you should explain yourself better



are you saying that line is in the poem, but there really is no HOB being referred to? there really is no HOB in the area of the quest?



so then it would be totally misleading and a red herring put in to send people on a wild goose chase?



and somehow maybe if we solve something hidden in this whole thing, we can figure out that HOB in fact was put in intentionally only to be ignored?



........................



or , are you saying that there is an HOB there, you just simply don't consider it a clue?



it is true, and it could be considered useful info, but you do not define it as a clue? is that it?



i don't want to argue semantics, it's pointless, i want to know someone's meaning



it is like the discussion on that other thread, i dont care that FF might say something is a clue and then say its not a clue, i have been able to ascertain his whole meaning and intention, so i am not going to quibble over his choice of words



the problem with saying that there are 9 clues and you found 9 clues and HOB is not one of them is that you don't know if you are using the same definition for clue that FF is using



someone reading your statement on here doesn't know what your definition of clue is, and whether or not it matches FFs intention of a clue, none of us know really.



depending on what definition of clues you want to use, it could mean there are parts that are clues and parts that are not, or it could mean the whole poem is clues.



by saying HOB is NOT a clue, it could imply that HOB is not important piece of info, when at the same time you could say it is NOT a clue, and in fact it is an important piece of info



so really, what are you all even saying





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09-03-2013, 06:00 PM,
#26
clueless about clues


<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from Fire Mtn Halo on September 3, 2013, 4:39 pm</b>

people that say HOB isn't a clue you should explain yourself better



are you saying that line is in the poem, but there really is no HOB being referred to? there really is no HOB in the area of the quest?



or , are you saying that there is an HOB there, you just simply don't consider it a clue?



it is true, and it could be considered useful info, but you do not define it as a clue? is that it?
</div>


Hah! Whoops! I fell into the same trap as Mr. Fenn. Sorry for the lack of clarity.



I meant to say "I don't think 'home of Brown' is one of the nine clues in the poem that lead to the end of this rainbow and the treasure."



I've edited my previous post to more precisely state my beliefs.



Let's say, for the sake of argument, that there are billion clues, and nine of them lead to the end of his rainbow and the treasure.



I don't consider 'home of Brown' one of those nine.



I don't think those other 999,999,991 clues are 'useless' - some may have some use - and I think that was a simple misstatement on Mr. Fenn's part, just like me saying I don't think 'home of Brown' is a clue.
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09-03-2013, 06:00 PM,
#27
clueless about clues


<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from Fire Mtn Halo on September 3, 2013, 4:39 pm</b>

people that say HOB isn't a clue you should explain yourself better



are you saying that line is in the poem, but there really is no HOB being referred to? there really is no HOB in the area of the quest?



so then it would be totally misleading and a red herring put in to send people on a wild goose chase?



and somehow maybe if we solve something hidden in this whole thing, we can figure out that HOB in fact was put in intentionally only to be ignored?
</div>


I'm not saying it isn't a clue. I'm just playing what-if games with Steph_R because it is a much more pleasant and possibly fruitful line of discussion than the noise that has going on here for the last few days.



The thing about Brown is that it was clearly put in there to get and hold our attention. It is even capitalized. Forrest might as well have had it printed in bold, 48 point, red ink. Look at all the threads devoted to HOB here. I could see Forrest using HOB as a bit of sleight of hand. Like the elaborate hand gestures and props a magician uses to distract your attention away from his palming a card or stealing your watch. We are all mesmerized and obsessed by the flamboyant use of phrases like WWWH and HOB and TFTW in the poem, but virtually ignore other lines where nothing important seems to be going on. I think it is possible that Forrest could be hiding the real clues, or at least very important ones, in those other places we aren't paying so much attention to, and that is why the poem is so difficult to solve.



Like I said earlier, six months ago I was absolutely convinced that HOB was a vital clue. Now that I've tried looking at the poem in different ways, I can see how HOB may not be all that important to solving it, at at least no more important than any other line. In the beginning I had trouble thinking up things that could fit HOB. So I figured it must be something rare and vitally important. Now I can think of several things that HOB could be, besides the obvious surname Brown or brown bears that a lot of people like to associate with it. I've had to start writing them all down so I don't forget a possible HOB solution. The more things I think of that could potentially fit HOB, the more common and less important is seems to me. Because a HOB might be found almost anywhere if you look hard enough.



These days I'm not letting the magician dictate where I place my attention. Right now I am far more interested in learning the real meanings behind mundane sounding lines like:



"As I have gone alone in there"

"and hint of riches new and old"

"Just take the chest and go in peace"

"I've done it tired and now I'm weak"

"So hear me all and listen good"

etc.



I could be all wrong of course. But this is a different way of looking at things. Somebody looking at the poem differently is going to be the person who solves it.



mdavis19
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09-03-2013, 06:34 PM,
#28
clueless about clues


<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from ThrillChaser on September 3, 2013, 7:00 pm</b>



Hah! Whoops! I fell into the same trap as Mr. Fenn. Sorry for the lack of clarity.



I meant to say "I don't think 'home of Brown' is one of the nine clues in the poem that lead to the end of this rainbow and the treasure."



I've edited my previous post to more precisely state my beliefs.



Let's say, for the sake of argument, that there are billion clues, and nine of them lead to the end of his rainbow and the treasure.



I don't consider 'home of Brown' one of those nine.



I don't think those other 999,999,991 clues are 'useless' - some may have some use - and I think that was a simple misstatement on Mr. Fenn's part, just like me saying I don't think 'home of Brown' is a clue.
</div>


you are saying here that you think HOB is not one of the nine clues



i already knew this from your previous post



i am asking you to clarify what you have not explained, and somehow you danced right around it again



what is the HOB, why is it in the poem. i am asking you what you think



so tell me what you think about the Home of Brown



does the HOB exist? is it in the area of the quest and path to the treasure at all? is it actually somewhere along the path or at the beginning?



see when you say that you think HOB is not a clue, then it begs the question, what do you think of it then. how are you relegating it, how do you relegate its significance or lack of. why is it even in the poem.



you must have considered these questions when you decided that something that is otherwise so obviously significant in the poem, is somehow not a clue



and if you did, then what was your conclusion as to these considerations? if you did not consider these questions, then it makes me wonder about the logic you are using to say it is not a clue



and if you did consider these questions, then why do you not include that in your reasoning.



if you think there is no HOB then what .... a false thing that doesn't exist was intentionally included in the poem?



just want to know what you think about it





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09-03-2013, 08:16 PM,
#29
clueless about clues
I thought ThrillChaser answered it... HOB is not one of the (9) nine clues.



to that Thrillchaser, what are the 9 clues? that has been my downfall with the poem. KNOWING what he means the 9 clues are.



I see 9 lines... or maybe 9 sentences... or maybe 6 stanzas and 24 lines and etc.etc. is 9 a clue itself.





Here's a thought, what if the poem solves itself and there are 9 thing you may have discovered that are the real clues but not actually in the words of the poem. " the poem CONTAINS 9 clues" who's to say any word or line are the clues?
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09-04-2013, 01:50 AM,
#30
clueless about clues


<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from Fire Mtn Halo on September 3, 2013, 7:34 pm</b>

what is the HOB, why is it in the poem. i am asking you what you think
</div>


Short answer: I don't think any of the nine clues that lead to the end of his rainbow and the treasure are words or phrases in the "literal poem".



I don't think you can win by trying to match nouns/verbs/etc in the literal poem to real people/places/things/events/whatever. After the fact, you should be able to perform that match-up, as I do believe the literal poem can be used as a "solution validator."



To answer directly about HOB, I believe of course that there are many possible HOB, and I believe once you solve the nine clues in the poem, one of those 'homes of Brown' should fit into the geography of where the nine clues in the poem lead you, along with a canyon down, a creek, water high, etc.



Ironically, I do think the name of water high is a clue in the poem! Crazy!

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