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DID YOU FIND ANY CLUES IN THE BOOK
09-15-2013, 03:37 PM,
#41
DID YOU FIND ANY CLUES IN THE BOOK
I don't get to search very often. I drive from my home in Florida to property I own in Arizona and back twice each year. Along the way I take side trips to search for Forrest's treasure. My idea of a fun vacation has always been exploring aimlessly in the mountains enjoying the scenery and clean air. Now I have an aim (to find the treasure), but nothing much else has changed. I still traipse around the mountains enjoying the scenery. I don't mind a little discomfort along the way. Cactus, heat, cold, rain, mud, dust storms, early or late snow, extreme altitude, I've seen them all, and camped through it too. I enjoy the challenge. On the other hand, I doubt that very much misery is actually going to be required to recover Forrest's treasure. Realistically, how far could an 80 year old man have carried it from his vehicle, even in two installments? I'm sure the treasure is within 500 feet of a road. Maybe a road that requires a high clearance 4X4, and is well off the beaten path, but a road none the less. There won't be too much misery along those 500 feet. Well, come to think of it, maybe it would be smart of Forrest to hide it in a brier patch. Just as one last challenge.



mdavis19
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09-15-2013, 05:06 PM,
#42
DID YOU FIND ANY CLUES IN THE BOOK
I also live a long ways away from my search area. I get to have boots on the ground two times a year. In searching I must shave my area down to a small area before I leave home. I believe the only clues in the book are in the poem but there are hints that only come into play when you find the area after following the clues. (My opinion)
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09-15-2013, 07:21 PM,
#43
DID YOU FIND ANY CLUES IN THE BOOK


<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from mdavis19 on September 15, 2013, 4:37 pm</b>

I don't get to search very often. I drive from my home in Florida to property I own in Arizona and back twice each year. Along the way I take side trips to search for Forrest's treasure. My idea of a fun vacation has always been exploring aimlessly in the mountains enjoying the scenery and clean air. Now I have an aim (to find the treasure), but nothing much else has changed. I still traipse around the mountains enjoying the scenery. I don't mind a little discomfort along the way. Cactus, heat, cold, rain, mud, dust storms, early or late snow, extreme altitude, I've seen them all, and camped through it too. I enjoy the challenge. On the other hand, I doubt that very much misery is actually going to be required to recover Forrest's treasure. Realistically, how far could an 80 year old man have carried it from his vehicle, even in two installments? I'm sure the treasure is within 500 feet of a road. Maybe a road that requires a high clearance 4X4, and is well off the beaten path, but a road none the less. There won't be too much misery along those 500 feet. Well, come to think of it, maybe it would be smart of Forrest to hide it in a brier patch. Just as one last challenge.



mdavis19
</div>


I agree up to a point. I don't know how to decide what an 80 year old is capable of. I read a book (Finders Keepers which I highly recommend) in which Fenn was mentioned briefly and his walk was described as a "shuffle" which would suggest to me that he isn't in the same league as the 80 year old who climbed Everest.

An 84 year old came to our wedding which required a 1200 foot climb. She arrived an hour early to get a head start. The hardest "search" I've done was really difficult, but it was only a climb of something like 700'. I assumed that there was an easy way to get to where I was going but that I didn't know it. My choices were to spend hours searching for the easy way up which might or might not exist. I spent 2 hours searching for the "easy way" and not finding it. Then I just went for it and did a 1 1/2 mile bushwhack that took 4 1/2 hours one way at which point I reached a dead end. It was spectacular. I hope to do it again and to take some rock climbing friends with me. Then we'll explore the stuff I want to explore. I had very close to zero expectation of finding Fenn's treasure up there: <i>close</i> to zero but not zero. I told the brains of my operation (my wife and daughter) that I thought it was a desperate act (in terms of treasure hunting) but that it would be entertaining for me. I've considered most of my "searching" exploring more than actual <i>searching</i>. To actually search you have to have solved the poem from beginning to end. I have explored the area fairly extensively while waiting for ideas about the poem to come. Ultimately the ideas came in conjunction with the exploration. I have a solution now, my first that goes from beginning to end. Oddly enough I'm not particularly excited about it. Early on I got far more excited about far less.
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09-16-2013, 09:43 AM,
#44
DID YOU FIND ANY CLUES IN THE BOOK
Not trying to be a wise guy, but is that question really possible to answer, without having the chest in your hands?? James
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09-16-2013, 10:41 AM,
#45
DID YOU FIND ANY CLUES IN THE BOOK
After I posted the above conjecture that the treasure is hidden within 500 feet of a road, I went shopping. I coincidentally bought a case of bottled water that weighed a little over half the weight of the treasure. Carrying it from my truck into my house (which from where I park is a bit of a walk) I became even more convinced the treasure is near a road. I'll grant that the packaging of the water is awkward and hard to carry. However I certainly wouldn't want to carry that load any serious distance over rough ground, and I'm not anywhere near 80 years old.



mdavis19
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09-16-2013, 01:21 PM,
#46
DID YOU FIND ANY CLUES IN THE BOOK
md19-

I have a milk crate filled with magazines that weighs 42 lbs, and it's a pretty concentrated load and quite heavy. I also have some small amplifiers that weigh close to that. Given the small size of the chest, that weight is even more concentrated.



42 lbs is not unreasonable when distributed in a pack, but carrying the filled and unlocked chest would be quite a challenge, not to mention the fact that it has an open, hinged lid and should ideally be carried level, not tilted on end. Tilting it on end would allow the contents to dump to the bottom and risk possible damage of the contents (jewelry, jar, etc.). So taking the contents out might be a good idea.



I have done the logistics for creating a wooden box of the correct size with lead ingots that together weigh 42 lbs, just so I can truly understand it. It will only be a problem for one person, of course, so I don't worry about it. If I encounter THAT problem, tough noogies and I can deal.



But, there's that infamous quote out there that Forrest took two trips to hide the chest- “Maybe that’s why a 79 year old man had to make two trips to hide the treasure.” This would reduce the load to only about 21 lbs each trip. That's a pretty reasonable load for just about anyone, especially in a backpack. Since Forrest knew exactly where he was going and knew the terrain intimately, he wouldn't likely need a lot of additional gear that a searcher might bring. And I don't believe he brought a shovel, but that's me.



So while I think that the treasure could be 500' or less from a road, I think it could also be a lot farther than that, depending upon the terrain. And how close would he want his bones to a road, which might regular municipal/state maintenance, widening, etc? (unless it's private...)



Also, regarding the "within 500'" comment, most comments relate to being within 500' horizontally on a path or trail, or within a radius on a map. But what about the vertical dimension? What if people were dead-on the treasure location, but 500' above it or below it and oblivious to it? In the mountains you need to think in 3D.



SYand(21+21)lbsHeavier,

Halogetter

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09-16-2013, 01:58 PM,
#47
DID YOU FIND ANY CLUES IN THE BOOK
There's a little part of me that thinks maybe Forrest tricked someone into carrying the chest to its spot and they just had no idea what they were carrying. I imagine it went down something like "I bet you twenty bucks you can't even lift my oversize tacklebox. Oh my, you can! Well how about double or nothing says you can't get it to the top of that hill!" And forty dollars later he's got the chest squirreled away, not even breaking a sweat, laughing to himself. Sometimes it's not what you can do, it's what you can get done.
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09-16-2013, 02:55 PM,
#48
DID YOU FIND ANY CLUES IN THE BOOK


<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from tomwhat on September 16, 2013, 2:58 pm</b>

There's a little part of me that thinks maybe Forrest tricked someone into carrying the chest to its spot and they just had no idea what they were carrying. I imagine it went down something like "I bet you twenty bucks you can't even lift my oversize tacklebox. Oh my, you can! Well how about double or nothing says you can't get it to the top of that hill!" And forty dollars later he's got the chest squirreled away, not even breaking a sweat, laughing to himself. Sometimes it's not what you can do, it's what you can get done.
</div>


The Captain of a Pirate ship did something like that. And then ran a sword threw the Helpful cabin boy.

Hmm, two people can keep a secret if one of them is dead. :?
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09-16-2013, 05:10 PM,
#49
DID YOU FIND ANY CLUES IN THE BOOK


<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from Jason on September 16, 2013, 5:39 pm</b>

Just think how <i>NOISY</i> it must have been to carry around a bunch of loose coins, nuggets, jewelry, a glass jar, some Jade carvings, etc.



People know the sound of rustling pocket change, and I think they would certainly take notice and ask a few questions if an old guy went shuffling off into the wilderness sounding like a slot machine paying out a jackpot. Where ever he parked, there must not have been other people around.



Concerning the 42 pounds... There is one spot in the book which references the number 42. Page 95 "<i>That thought is deeply personal and indelible in me even now, forty-two years after I was there.</i>" (That thought being the French soldiers who are forever forgotten)




</div>


There is also the ~42 pound weight of the solid gold book and lines 2 & 3 which have 6 and 7 syllables respectively.
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09-16-2013, 06:08 PM,
#50
DID YOU FIND ANY CLUES IN THE BOOK
tomwhat made this observation. http://www.chasechat.com/chat/?minglefor...opic&t=311



There should be error bars on the measurements but in any event if you measure the external dimensions of the book you'll get a volume that is consistent with the solid gold book being 42 pounds.
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