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Not far, but too far to walk
02-29-2016, 08:37 PM, (This post was last modified: 02-29-2016, 08:38 PM by pconnors.)
#1
Not far, but too far to walk
I've never liked the idea of "too far to walk" being some sort of an arbitrary distance (like 10 miles, etc). There's just too much variation when it comes to the level of confidence you need to find the treasure. So, I got to thinking, logically, about what kind of scenarios occur where something is physically not far, but too far to walk. So far I've come up with:

* A waterfall - Imagine a waterfall that goes down 200 feet. That's not far at all (200 feet), but it's too far to walk since it's straight down.

* A tunnel - While a road tunnel can be walked, it's probably not the case with a train tunnel (at least safely). There's other kind of tunnels too. It's not hard to imagine a tunnel in the rockies that is not very long, but, since it passes under some very high peaks and rough terrain, it would be "too far to walk". Perhaps a place where "Warm Waters" enter a tunnel of some sort?

* An arbitrary boundary of some sort - Example: The border of a national park, or a latitude/longitude line. Again, it's possible for one of these to be "not far" in an "as the crow flies" sense of the word, but be too far to walk due to the difficulty of the terrain, etc.

* Under Water - Distances can be "not far" under water, but I would argue that just about any distance under water is "too far to walk".

Curious if anyone else thinks of other scenarios?
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02-29-2016, 08:49 PM,
#2
RE: Not far, but too far to walk
Its not really what I think it means.

NFBTFTW is an important clue to help find the HoB. We don't know the precise distance but if you did have a WWWH pinned down you could find HoB within 10 miles or so (give or take a mile or two) by following the canyon down. HoB would be almost impossible to find if its not on a map and we did not have that distance marker. In that way F has made it possible to solve HoB with BOTG IMO (difficult yes but not impossible).


"Let me tell you something else. I've seen a lot of spinals solves, Dude, and this guy is a fake. A ****ing goldbricker." -Walter Sobchack
Reply
02-29-2016, 09:35 PM,
#3
RE: Not far, but too far to walk
(02-29-2016, 08:37 PM)pconnors Wrote: I've never liked the idea of "too far to walk" being some sort of an arbitrary distance (like 10 miles, etc). There's just too much variation when it comes to the level of confidence you need to find the treasure. So, I got to thinking, logically, about what kind of scenarios occur where something is physically not far, but too far to walk. So far I've come up with:

* A waterfall - Imagine a waterfall that goes down 200 feet. That's not far at all (200 feet), but it's too far to walk since it's straight down.

* A tunnel - While a road tunnel can be walked, it's probably not the case with a train tunnel (at least safely). There's other kind of tunnels too. It's not hard to imagine a tunnel in the rockies that is not very long, but, since it passes under some very high peaks and rough terrain, it would be "too far to walk". Perhaps a place where "Warm Waters" enter a tunnel of some sort?

* An arbitrary boundary of some sort - Example: The border of a national park, or a latitude/longitude line. Again, it's possible for one of these to be "not far" in an "as the crow flies" sense of the word, but be too far to walk due to the difficulty of the terrain, etc.

* Under Water - Distances can be "not far" under water, but I would argue that just about any distance under water is "too far to walk".

Curious if anyone else thinks of other scenarios?

I would think that a book called tftw would give some insight.... I wonder who will be first to argue with that. Fenn said at the book signing that it's explained in the preface.... another idea... what is before AND after the place tftw?

I like your thinking on the tunnel... sometimes when fenn says it's not in a tunnel, he may in fact mean it's in a tunnel. Just my opinion.
Ω  200 ft. Club  Ω
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02-29-2016, 11:40 PM,
#4
RE: Not far, but too far to walk
I have never believed that "Not far, but to far to walk." is a clue about a distance, at least in terms of understanding the line in a straightforward way. I believe it is possible that it could refer to a specific distance in a more abstract, interpretive way.

I have never read one account of this line referring to a particular distance that made any sense to me at all.

The idea of "too far" depends on the context. For example, a mile could be too far to walk for hikers if it was getting dark and they felt they needed to camp. Anything that cannot be walked in the allotted time period is too far to walk, at least for now. Three blocks is too far to walk for someone who can only manage one block. Too far to walk for any person is their own personal judgement or capability as to what's too far, etc., etc. So what distance are you or Forrest talking about?

And something that cannot be walked being interpreted as too far to walk, is not "too far". It is too something else, like impossible to walk, or cannot be walked, or requires something other than walking. Something that cannot be walked is not too far, it just cannot be walked, unless you are talking about a distance that is impossibly too far for anyone to walk, even if it is unwalkable- and what distance is that?

"Not far, but too far to walk." is definitely a critical clue to something for me, but not a distance. I do think it's important that Forrest is providing a negation of something linked to an affirmation of something else: Not this, but that. And the repeat of the word "far" hints at other possibilities of words that are used more than once in the poem.

Also, this line is the last of the stanza, and I believe it brings a definitive closure to the contiguous clues that precede it; it is an ending of sorts to a string of clues. Begin it where warm waters halt (and end) Not far, but too far to walk- at least a pause in the clue group, if you believe that the stanza is a group of clues... But it's really just the completion of the start.

Then Forrest wrote a book called too far to walk, and he speaks of it within regarding his reveries of his special experience on the Madison. Do you think he's talking about ten miles? I think he's talking about something that he once did, but that was long ago and from another time and circumstance. It's not about the impossibility of walking (or floating) a particular distance to me, it's the loss of something he once directly possessed and is now but a memory, which he shares. That was then, this is now.

Those are my thoughts, and yes, I have the same treasure chest that everyone else has...

Halogetter
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02-29-2016, 11:51 PM,
#5
RE: Not far, but too far to walk
Through my various puzzling adventures I found Cecil Day-Lewis. He was a poet and is the father of the actor Daniel Day-Lewis. He wrote a poem called "Is it Far to Go?": http://www.cday-lewis.co.uk/#/is-it-far-...4525378045

The answer is "A step - no further".

It's an interesting thought as it begs the question, "If you take a single step, have you technically walked?"

Do you need to take two steps to walk?

I'm just putting this out there as I don't believe I've seen this interpretation anywhere and it's kind of beautiful in its own way.
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03-01-2016, 12:44 AM,
#6
RE: Not far, but too far to walk
(02-29-2016, 11:40 PM)Halogetter Wrote: I have never believed that "Not far, but to far to walk." is a clue about a distance, at least in terms of understanding the line in a straightforward way.

That's a possibility I've considered. The title of his second book is "Too far too walk" and it's a collection of stories about his entire life. I know there's the part in the introduction about the Madison and 10 miles, but that just seems.... Too easy.. I wonder if there's something there about life as it relates to the stages of aging, time, memories of the past, etc.

"How many roads must a man walk down before you call him a man?"
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03-01-2016, 09:02 AM, (This post was last modified: 03-01-2016, 09:10 AM by John Brown.)
#7
RE: Not far, but too far to walk
(03-01-2016, 12:44 AM)pconnors Wrote:
(02-29-2016, 11:40 PM)Halogetter Wrote: I have never believed that "Not far, but to far to walk." is a clue about a distance, at least in terms of understanding the line in a straightforward way.

That's a possibility I've considered. The title of his second book is "Too far too walk" and it's a collection of stories about his entire life. I know there's the part in the introduction about the Madison and 10 miles, but that just seems.... Too easy.. I wonder if there's something there about life as it relates to the stages of aging, time, memories of the past, etc.

"How many roads must a man walk down before you call him a man?"

I asked him that years ago. He answered: Only one John. f

The title of his second book is not "Too Far to Walk." It is either

"Beat of the Drum and the Whoop of the Dance: A Study of the Life and Work of Joseph Henry Sharp Jun" (1983) or "J.H. Sharp: Sharp's Montana years brought immortality to Indians he painted" (1981).

I'm not sure if the "Sharp's Montana years" thing is actually a book or not.

(02-29-2016, 11:40 PM)Halogetter Wrote: I have never believed that "Not far, but to far to walk." is a clue about a distance, at least in terms of understanding the line in a straightforward way. I believe it is possible that it could refer to a specific distance in a more abstract, interpretive way.

I have never read one account of this line referring to a particular distance that made any sense to me at all.

The idea of "too far" depends on the context. For example, a mile could be too far to walk for hikers if it was getting dark and they felt they needed to camp. Anything that cannot be walked in the allotted time period is too far to walk, at least for now. Three blocks is too far to walk for someone who can only manage one block. Too far to walk for any person is their own personal judgement or capability as to what's too far, etc., etc. So what distance are you or Forrest talking about?

And something that cannot be walked being interpreted as too far to walk, is not "too far". It is too something else, like impossible to walk, or cannot be walked, or requires something other than walking. Something that cannot be walked is not too far, it just cannot be walked, unless you are talking about a distance that is impossibly too far for anyone to walk, even if it is unwalkable- and what distance is that?

"Not far, but too far to walk." is definitely a critical clue to something for me, but not a distance. I do think it's important that Forrest is providing a negation of something linked to an affirmation of something else: Not this, but that. And the repeat of the word "far" hints at other possibilities of words that are used more than once in the poem.

Also, this line is the last of the stanza, and I believe it brings a definitive closure to the contiguous clues that precede it; it is an ending of sorts to a string of clues. Begin it where warm waters halt (and end) Not far, but too far to walk- at least a pause in the clue group, if you believe that the stanza is a group of clues... But it's really just the completion of the start.

Then Forrest wrote a book called too far to walk, and he speaks of it within regarding his reveries of his special experience on the Madison. Do you think he's talking about ten miles? I think he's talking about something that he once did, but that was long ago and from another time and circumstance. It's not about the impossibility of walking (or floating) a particular distance to me, it's the loss of something he once directly possessed and is now but a memory, which he shares. That was then, this is now.

Those are my thoughts, and yes, I have the same treasure chest that everyone else has...

Halogetter

There is an overhang or a cave, not sure which, upstream of Randy's raft, on the same side of the river (the east bank). We headed up stream on the east bank a few weeks ago. We made it 1/2 mile by 12:45PM. I really really wanted to go the 1/4 mile to the overhang because I think that it is pretty likely he met his end there, especially if he was wet. On that terrain one doesn't measure one's progress in miles per hour but in hours per mile. I reckoned it was an hour to the over hang and an hour and a half back to the raft from the overhang and then an hour and a half to the rim. On that day the 400 yards between and the overhang was ... too far to walk.
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03-07-2016, 11:32 AM,
#8
Not far, but too far to walk
Chamanta nice link, thanks.

Nftftw might be a place with a name that is too far to walk, for examples sake Sussex, WY
uken2it
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03-07-2016, 04:06 PM,
#9
RE: Not far, but too far to walk
I just think that "Not far, but too far" is a clue in itself. I think it is one or two of the 9 clues.
Not 4 but 24.
or 44 as in two 4's.

Think about it. The poem has 24 lines.
that line sounds like "not one but two fours".
The title is not proper.
The original was written by John Hersey. Look at a picture of John Hersey. He looks like like Forrest when he was younger. Also he died on 3/24. The same numbers that keep popping up.
324=CBD. Or DBC. 423 is the same numbers where his dad was buried. There was a post a few days ago using the same letters DBC.

Instead of looking at "distance" before you have any idea where the treasure might be, look at the words and see what the hell they mean. Put those clues together before you try to find the ending.
Reply
03-07-2016, 05:55 PM, (This post was last modified: 03-07-2016, 06:06 PM by muset.)
#10
RE: Not far, but too far to walk
(02-29-2016, 08:37 PM)pconnors Wrote: I've never liked the idea of "too far to walk" being some sort of an arbitrary distance (like 10 miles, etc). There's just too much variation when it comes to the level of confidence you need to find the treasure. So, I got to thinking, logically, about what kind of scenarios occur where something is physically not far, but too far to walk. So far I've come up with:

* A waterfall - Imagine a waterfall that goes down 200 feet. That's not far at all (200 feet), but it's too far to walk since it's straight down.

* A tunnel - While a road tunnel can be walked, it's probably not the case with a train tunnel (at least safely). There's other kind of tunnels too. It's not hard to imagine a tunnel in the rockies that is not very long, but, since it passes under some very high peaks and rough terrain, it would be "too far to walk". Perhaps a place where "Warm Waters" enter a tunnel of some sort?

* An arbitrary boundary of some sort - Example: The border of a national park, or a latitude/longitude line. Again, it's possible for one of these to be "not far" in an "as the crow flies" sense of the word, but be too far to walk due to the difficulty of the terrain, etc.

* Under Water - Distances can be "not far" under water, but I would argue that just about any distance under water is "too far to walk".

Curious if anyone else thinks of other scenarios?

Yes.

In the Preface to TFTW, Forrest talks about taking out a Dinghy near West Yellowstone and fishing downstream to Baker's Hole. He not longer does that because he says that it is too far to walk. I think he means the trip back with the deflated dinghy in his backpack from Baker's Hole back to West Yellowstone is too far for him to walk now.

The implied clue might be about the mode of transport rather than the distance.
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