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Poll: Does wwwh actually refer to water?
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Y
77.27%
17 77.27%
N
22.73%
5 22.73%
Total 22 vote(s) 100%
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a big what if
03-26-2016, 07:06 PM, (This post was last modified: 03-26-2016, 07:08 PM by Chris Yates.)
#31
RE: a big what if
(03-26-2016, 06:48 PM)mdavis19 Wrote: It does not imply that they will be easy to find, or that they will conform to the "conventional wisdom" about what the clues are, or what they might mean. The conventional wisdom hasn't gotten anyone anywhere, and likely never will.

....conventional wisdom about what the clues are and what they might mean

ok

there are literally thousands of differing opinions on this. what clues are and what they might mean

i dont think conventional wisdom exists here in any meaningful sense

but, i get it. there's this thing lurking out there... this ... "conventional wisdom"

and that is certainly not you mdavis! no sirrrrreeeee

you just might figure this out after all, you non-conventional thinker you!
Reply
03-26-2016, 07:09 PM, (This post was last modified: 03-26-2016, 07:19 PM by HarryFool.)
#32
RE: a big what if
(03-26-2016, 06:48 PM)mdavis19 Wrote:
(03-26-2016, 05:12 PM)HarryFool Wrote:
(03-26-2016, 05:02 PM)mdavis19 Wrote: Lack of imagination on the part of searchers is not Forrest's fault.

mdavis19

Imagination may be required to bridge the gaps in the poem or to find the spot (the poem is very deficient at describing the spot which I assume was by design) but I doubt it would help solve any of the clues. A comprehensive knowledge of Geography is more valuable in that regard.

We know the first two clues can be found on the map (or at least that was implied by F with his little girl form India comment) and i really doubt imagination is needed there.

More imagination is required than anyone here has. A little girl in India can find the first two clues with a map. That implies anyone can find them with a map. It does not imply that they will be easy to find, or that they will conform to the "conventional wisdom" about what the clues are, or what they might mean. The conventional wisdom hasn't gotten anyone anywhere, and likely never will.

mdavis19

Very little imagination is required for the first two clues IMO

A map can only tell you a few things. It could tell you the name of a place or mountain. It could show its (relative) height and position. Some maps could show geological features like hot springs, geysers et al.

Some maps show the continental divide (contain the highest peaks in the Rockies which are most likely to have snow on them year round)

Some maps have names of mountains which could qualify as a possible WWWH (EG Ice Mountain in Colorado)

Imagine all you want but a map has surprisingly limited information compared to say the resources of the Internet. It was a huge clue by F that narrowed down WWWH considerably IMHO.

Heres a good test for WWWH. Go to a high mountain 13,000 ft+ and take a pee. Does the pee "halt" when contacting the ground?


"Let me tell you something else. I've seen a lot of spinals solves, Dude, and this guy is a fake. A ****ing goldbricker." -Walter Sobchack
Reply
03-26-2016, 07:13 PM,
#33
RE: a big what if
(03-26-2016, 05:30 PM)3paulb Wrote: From mind to map seems to be the most difficult journey. This is where imagination is needed. The clues will fall into place when the spot is found.
I think a very basic knowledge of geography will be sufficient , and a map good enough to show major peaks and rivers.
The poem provides the directions and research (outside the poem)will be of little use. The poem has all the information one needs.
There are few places that will fulfill Fenn's desire to become part of the folklore of the west. It's all about the end, and the end will not be in some secluded valley, or trout stream in the wilderness.It will be visible for miles and be seen by "passers by" for centuries. This is how you live for ever in the southwest.

"See that mountain over there, that's where they found Forrest Fenn's treasure". "It used to be xyz but now everyone calls it Fenn's Peak.

You must have been Director John Ford in a previous lifetime. Monument Valley is where the treasure is located, right there at the base of Tea Pot Rock. Starring Osborne Russell as Forrest Fenn.
Reply
03-26-2016, 07:14 PM,
#34
RE: a big what if
(03-26-2016, 07:09 PM)HarryFool Wrote: Imagine all you want but a map has surprisingly limited information compared to say the resources of the Internet. It was a huge clue by F that narrowed down WWWH considerably IMHO.

maps are a source of certain information that i was not able to find elsewhere on the internet
Reply
03-26-2016, 07:39 PM, (This post was last modified: 03-26-2016, 07:41 PM by DeeepThnkr.)
#35
RE: a big what if
(03-25-2016, 02:20 PM)tom Wrote: It has nothing to do with actual water in the Rocky
Mountains.
I agree, having to start over sucks but I'm through 3 clues/1 stanza already. 2 states the clues are in hmmmm.

(03-26-2016, 04:28 PM)Chris Yates Wrote:
(03-26-2016, 04:04 PM)decall Wrote: REALLY? wwwh has nothing to do with water?? Fenn's book has nothing to do with water? Fenn's life has nothing to do with water? The correct solve has nothing to do with water?
OMG, thank you for helping us understand how to solve this bro.

Decall, im not sure if you're appreciating the true genius it takes to come to this conclusion

wwwh ≠ water

I do, it is very much an enigma, sort of.
Reply
03-26-2016, 08:05 PM,
#36
RE: a big what if
(03-26-2016, 07:09 PM)HarryFool Wrote:
(03-26-2016, 06:48 PM)mdavis19 Wrote:
(03-26-2016, 05:12 PM)HarryFool Wrote:
(03-26-2016, 05:02 PM)mdavis19 Wrote: Lack of imagination on the part of searchers is not Forrest's fault.

mdavis19

Imagination may be required to bridge the gaps in the poem or to find the spot (the poem is very deficient at describing the spot which I assume was by design) but I doubt it would help solve any of the clues. A comprehensive knowledge of Geography is more valuable in that regard.

We know the first two clues can be found on the map (or at least that was implied by F with his little girl form India comment) and i really doubt imagination is needed there.

More imagination is required than anyone here has. A little girl in India can find the first two clues with a map. That implies anyone can find them with a map. It does not imply that they will be easy to find, or that they will conform to the "conventional wisdom" about what the clues are, or what they might mean. The conventional wisdom hasn't gotten anyone anywhere, and likely never will.

mdavis19

Very little imagination is required for the first two clues IMO

A map can only tell you a few things. It could tell you the name of a place or mountain. It could show its (relative) height and position. Some maps could show geological features like hot springs, geysers et al.

Some maps show the continental divide (contain the highest peaks in the Rockies which are most likely to have snow on them year round)

Some maps have names of mountains which could qualify as a possible WWWH (EG Ice Mountain in Colorado)

Imagine all you want but a map has surprisingly limited information compared to say the resources of the Internet. It was a huge clue by F that narrowed down WWWH considerably IMHO.

Heres a good test for WWWH. Go to a high mountain 13,000 ft+ and take a pee. Does the pee "halt" when contacting the ground?

Maps show lots of things. More than most people think to consider. So many of them are stuck on rivers, creeks, fishing holes and hot springs. They don't see either the big picture, or the fine details.

Forrest said there are many WWWHs in the Rockies, and most are north of Santa Fe. A better exercise than pissing on a mountain might to be to make a list of all the kinds of features seen on a map of the Rockies that are mostly north of Santa Fe. There are a lot more things than most people would think of. With imagination some of them could be WWWHs.

mdavis19
Reply
03-26-2016, 09:07 PM,
#37
RE: a big what if
(03-26-2016, 09:00 PM)mountain digger Wrote:
(03-26-2016, 08:05 PM)mdavis19 Wrote: Maps show lots of things. More than most of people think to consider. So many of them are stuck on rivers, creeks, fishing holes and hot springs. They don't see either the big picture, or the fine details.

Forrest said there are many WWWHs in the Rockies, and most are north of Santa Fe. A better exercise than pissing on a mountain might to be to make a list of all the kinds of features seen on a map of the Rockies that are mostly north of Santa Fe. There are a lot more things than most people would think of. With imagination some of them could be WWWHs.

mdavis19

OK, I'll start. A good map has a legend. First American believed that there are 7 directions on one's life map. North, South, East, West, Up, Down, and Within. A special legend on the right map?

No, but at least you are thinking. I was literally talking about the geographic and other features to be found on maps. People get so fixated on just a few features, based on their preconceived notions. There is a lot more to be found on maps than most people think there is, if you actually study them.

mdavis19
Reply
03-26-2016, 09:14 PM,
#38
a big what if
If a good map has a legend I would assume the correct map has a story
uken2it
Reply
03-26-2016, 09:52 PM,
#39
RE: a big what if
(03-26-2016, 09:17 PM)mountain digger Wrote:
(03-26-2016, 09:07 PM)mdavis19 Wrote:
(03-26-2016, 09:00 PM)mountain digger Wrote:
(03-26-2016, 08:05 PM)mdavis19 Wrote: Maps show lots of things. More than most of people think to consider. So many of them are stuck on rivers, creeks, fishing holes and hot springs. They don't see either the big picture, or the fine details.

Forrest said there are many WWWHs in the Rockies, and most are north of Santa Fe. A better exercise than pissing on a mountain might to be to make a list of all the kinds of features seen on a map of the Rockies that are mostly north of Santa Fe. There are a lot more things than most people would think of. With imagination some of them could be WWWHs.

mdavis19

OK, I'll start. A good map has a legend. First American believed that there are 7 directions on one's life map. North, South, East, West, Up, Down, and Within. A special legend on the right map?

No, but at least you are thinking. I was literally talking about the geographic and other features to be found on maps. People get so fixated on just a few features, based on their preconceived notions. There is a lot more to be found on maps than most people think there is, if you actually study them.

mdavis19

Yes, I thought you were talking geographic and other features but I was not thinking literally. As instructed, I'm doing my best to use my imagination ... limited though it is.

The imagination comes in when interpreting features on the maps with an open mind, and without the conventional wisdom blinders so many in the chase are wearing. WWWH must be a water feature, right? Maybe not. HOB must be a home and/or be associated with someone named Brown, right? Not necessarily. Maps show a lot of other possibilities.

mdavis19
Reply
03-26-2016, 10:59 PM,
#40
RE: a big what if
(03-26-2016, 10:10 PM)mountain digger Wrote:
(03-26-2016, 09:52 PM)mdavis19 Wrote: Maps show a lot of other possibilities.
mdavis19

And some maps are not printed with ink on paper.

Ooooh. Like the fuel map in your car's computer.
-T-


“I’ve said searchers should go back to the poem so many times that I don’t want to say it again here.” -ff

“The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.” -Sherlock Holmes
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