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IN Where?
04-30-2017, 06:32 AM,
#1
IN Where?
"As I have gone alone in there"
In where?
A valley?
The end of a canyon with no way out other than turning back?
A well defined vicinity?
The wilderness itself?

hard to be sure you are alone in these places, although feasible.

is it a place which makes it more personal, such as a cave, dugout or an isolated alpine lake, a crevice or pathway leading to an otherwise unreachable area?

Liv42dy
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04-30-2017, 10:06 AM,
#2
RE: IN Where?
It's at the end of a long rough road that is a dead end.
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04-30-2017, 11:32 AM,
#3
RE: IN Where?
The "in" isn't the focus, it's the "I" you should answer.....who/what is "I" in the sentence?
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04-30-2017, 12:49 PM,
#4
RE: IN Where?
(04-30-2017, 11:00 AM)McFly Wrote: The crystal stream of eternity

Sounds fancy
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04-30-2017, 01:27 PM,
#5
RE: IN Where?
"I" is Forrest Fenn of course. Certainly that aspect is straight forward. You cannot second guess everything, IMO you are looking a gift horse in the mouth.

Sierra, There is no reason to go on if you feel the answer is D.
Perhaps that is the smartest thing to do however.

IMO "in there" is a vicinity or area where there are no meek.

What a fascinating and exciting chase this year compared to past years. Focus grasshopper and you too may see the light and gravity of the situation.

Enjoy
Liv42dy
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04-30-2017, 01:37 PM,
#6
RE: IN Where?
#liv42dy

I'm only going to say this once, the 9 clues in Fenn's poem will lead you straight to the chest, so don't worry about where there is. You really have to learn how to get rid of all of the garbage in the poem, if you don't, then WM will pick you up and take you straight to the City Dump.

Fenn wrote this poem from the heart, but you don't need all of the extras to get to the chest.
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04-30-2017, 08:33 PM,
#7
RE: IN Where?
(04-30-2017, 01:25 PM)McFly Wrote: Ts Eliot maaaaaannn! Whoever finds/found it is going to shit their pants.... Were just picking up on an expedition that started almost 500 years ago, yet no one knows it! This is the chase to cibola, the 7 cities of gold, el dorado! The treasures of the lnights templar (the secret truth of jesus and mary). The missing treasures of the azteks, incans and mayans. All the information is right there in the poem and the contents of the chest. The item in his chest are the new riches hinting at the old ones.... Origionally i was under the assumption that the poem would lead me to cibola, but fenn is too smart for that. Itll only lead you to the chest. But whats in the chest will take you the rest of the way! But imo, the crystal stream of eternity IS special to him, because of where it leads... Which is why even though i didnt find the chest, if i follow the stream to its end, i would be willing to bet id come across that secret waterfall and unlock the great mystery of the past...

Forrest hints at this being the case too... Go read ts eliots full poem the 4th quartet that forrest quoted. Or edgar allen poes el dorado. It all matches up with his illustrations and things hes said. Go to oldsantafetradingco.com and ho to his blog (2011) and read the douglas preston tab. The cities of gold!... Theres more, way more! What about ehen douglas preston gave praise to forrest for finding his own lost city! Wait??? What lost city???? Precisely my point, the man is 87 years old, found a lost city, loves prestons cities of gold book, and yet nobodys heard about his city? Whats he waiting for?????

San Lazaro!...
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04-30-2017, 09:56 PM, (This post was last modified: 04-30-2017, 09:57 PM by RahRah.)
#8
RE: IN Where?
(04-30-2017, 08:35 PM)Andrew Jef Wrote:
(04-30-2017, 11:32 AM)RahRah Wrote: The "in" isn't the focus, it's the "I" you should answer.....who/what is "I" in the sentence?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

RahRah, "I" has always meant Forrest Fenn in the poem, as far as I am
concerned. It works for me. I think people are trying too hard, or at least
over-thinking the poem. It's pretty straightforward to me.

What is "I" to you in the poem?

I am silver and exact. I have no preconceptions.
What ever you see I swallow immediately
Just as it is, unmisted by love or dislike.
I am not cruel, only truthful---
The eye of a little god, four-cornered.
Most of the time I meditate on the opposite wall.
It is pink, with speckles. I have looked at it so long
I think it is a part of my heart. But it flickers.
Faces and darkness separate us over and over.
Now I am a lake. A woman bends over me,
Searching my reaches for what she really is.
Then she turns to those liars, the candles or the moon.
I see her back, and reflect it faithfully.
She rewards me with tears and an agitation of hands.
I am important to her. She comes and goes.
Each morning it is her face that replaces the darkness.
In me she has drowned a young girl, and in me an old woman
Rises toward her day after day, like a terrible fish.

In the above, "I" is a mirror, not the poet/writer...it's an inanimate object, but an "I" nonetheless. One of the biggest issues with first-person use of "I" in poetry is the inability of a reader to see the big picture because of the closeness the use of "I" brings them to the author, rather than the subject (someone or something) doing the narrating, when the author's intent is not themselves, but the narrator they're writing.

In Fenn's poem, "I" is not Fenn.
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05-01-2017, 09:16 AM,
#9
IN Where?
Of course I is Fenn. Just look at his books, ALL the pictures are Fenn. Fenn Fenn Fenn.

Now, "in there"

1. You literally go in the hidey place. (As Fenn did)
(The poem would not be brilliant if it only meant one thing)
2. The most obvious would be death. The poem symbolic of death. Read it again. Think only of death. Ther is no denying Fenn has this theme in TTOTC.
3. Other themes
These themes do get you to the treasure chest. How? It shows you what to look for. Basically it's the most confirmation we can get.
Ω  200 ft. Club  Ω
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05-01-2017, 10:22 AM,
#10
RE: IN Where?
(04-30-2017, 09:56 PM)RahRah Wrote:
(04-30-2017, 08:35 PM)Andrew Jef Wrote:
(04-30-2017, 11:32 AM)RahRah Wrote: The "in" isn't the focus, it's the "I" you should answer.....who/what is "I" in the sentence?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

RahRah, "I" has always meant Forrest Fenn in the poem, as far as I am
concerned. It works for me. I think people are trying too hard, or at least
over-thinking the poem. It's pretty straightforward to me.

What is "I" to you in the poem?

I am silver and exact. I have no preconceptions.
What ever you see I swallow immediately
Just as it is, unmisted by love or dislike.
I am not cruel, only truthful---
The eye of a little god, four-cornered.
Most of the time I meditate on the opposite wall.
It is pink, with speckles. I have looked at it so long
I think it is a part of my heart. But it flickers.
Faces and darkness separate us over and over.
Now I am a lake. A woman bends over me,
Searching my reaches for what she really is.
Then she turns to those liars, the candles or the moon.
I see her back, and reflect it faithfully.
She rewards me with tears and an agitation of hands.
I am important to her. She comes and goes.
Each morning it is her face that replaces the darkness.
In me she has drowned a young girl, and in me an old woman
Rises toward her day after day, like a terrible fish.

In the above, "I" is a mirror, not the poet/writer...it's an inanimate object, but an "I" nonetheless. One of the biggest issues with first-person use of "I" in poetry is the inability of a reader to see the big picture because of the closeness the use of "I" brings them to the author, rather than the subject (someone or something) doing the narrating, when the author's intent is not themselves, but the narrator they're writing.

In Fenn's poem, "I" is not Fenn.

I agree with you, RahRah. "I" in the poem is not Fenn but an inanimate object or thing. But that thing changes from what it was in the first stanza, "As I have gone alone in there," to something else in the fifth stanza, where it says "...and now I'm weak."

"Alone" can mean "all one," which infers that the "I" consists of several parts acting as one.

"Weak" can mean "wee K", which is a small letter K (visible on the ground).

This is why Fenn is always telling us to "THINK." Think is just Thin K, the same as wee K, the same as see K or "seek" as in stanza 5. The K isn't the "word that is key" but it leads to the key, which can be seen through tight focus.
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